bonanza

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish bonanza ‎(calm sea, fair weather, good luck, rich lode), from Medieval Latin bonacia ‎(fair weather), a blend of bonus ‎(good) +‎ malacia ‎(calm sea).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bonanza ‎(plural bonanzas)

  1. In mining, a rich mine or vein of silver or gold.
  2. The point at which two mother lodes intersect
  3. By extension, anything which is a mine of wealth or yields a large income or return.
    • 2013 August 31, Bagehot, “The parable of the Clyde”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8851:
      For two decades the bonanza on Scotland’s west coast continued. An occupation that had been seasonal and modestly profitable became year-round and lucrative. Baskets of herring put televisions into fishermen’s cottages and cars outside their doors. But fish, like oil and gas, with which Scotland’s continental shelf is also well-endowed, are not in unlimited supply.
    The popular show quickly became a ratings bonanza for the network.

TranslationsEdit

AntonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

bonanza f ‎(plural bonanzas)

  1. good weather
  2. bloom, flourishing
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