See also: Broom and broom-

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
A man using a broom (utensil for sweeping)

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: bro͞om, bro͝om, IPA(key): /bɹuːm/, /bɹʊm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʊm, -uːm

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English broom, from Old English brōm (brushwood), from Proto-West Germanic *brām (bramble) (compare Saterland Frisian Brom, West Frisian brem, Dutch braam, German Low German Braam), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrem-, from *bʰer- ‘edge’. Related to brim, brink.

NounEdit

broom (countable and uncountable, plural brooms)

  1. (countable) A domestic utensil with fibers bound together at the end of a long handle, used for sweeping.
    Synonym: besom
  2. (countable, curling) An implement with which players sweep the ice to make a stone travel further and curl less; a sweeper.
  3. Any of several yellow-flowered shrubs of the family Fabaceae, in the tribe Genisteae, including genera Cytisus, Genista, and Spartium, with long, thin branches and small or few leaves.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by William Shakespeare, act 4 scene 1:
      [] and thy broom groves,
      Whose shadow the dismissed bachelor loves,
      Being lass-lorn []
  4. (slang, rare) A gun, because it is more or less long, held similarly to a besom and “cleans” what is in front.
    • 2015 September 26, Ms. Hustle vs. O’fficial (Summer Madness; 5)‎[1], Ultimate Rap League, from 48:07–48:28:
      So keep talking all that fly shit, and I’ma grab the tool
      And the lead will get stuck in your head like a catchy tune
      Soon as I look down on a target, bitch, your ass is doomed
      Trust exercise with Ahdi, arms out to catch a boom
      You see this sweeper I got, it ain’t your average broom
      This ring will wet this bitch like a happy groom
    • 2020 July 2, LR of TPL (lyrics), “Stop Check”‎[2]:
      Pull up to the 🎵 get whacked with the broom
      TT liz on my line, so you know it got moved
      Distribute, click, click, shoot
      That's another face on frontline news
    • 2020 July 3, Y.CB of 7th (lyrics), “Lightwork Freestyle”‎[3]:
      Back that strap then blaze, fry man
      Tell bro “make sure you twos that yute”
      Rise that stick when the street needs cleaning
      The pigs know this ain't no average broom
    • 2020 October 23, DBF MD (lyrics), “Talk Bout Hollows”, 0:30–0:33:
      If F’s in the room
      step with the broom
      finna here a boom with a boom!
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:firearm
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

broom (third-person singular simple present brooms, present participle brooming, simple past and past participle broomed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To sweep with a broom.
    • 1855 September 29, Charles Dickens, "Model Officials", in Household Words: A Weekly Journal, Bradbury and Evens (1856), page 206:
      [] Sidi, I was busy in the exercise of my functions, occupied in brooming the front of the stables, when who should come but Hhamed Ould Denéï on horseback, at full gallop, as if he were going to break his neck. []
    • a. 1857, William Makepeace Thackeray, Our Street, in Christmas Books: Mrs. Perkins's Ball, Our Street, Dr. Birch, Chapman & Hall (1857), Our Street page 8:
      It was but this morning at eight, when poor Molly, was brooming the steps, and the baker paying her by no means unmerited compliments, that my landlady came whirling out of the ground-floor front, and sent the poor girl whimpering into the kitchen.
    • a. 1920, Opal Stanley Whiteley, The Story of Opal: The Journal of an Understanding Heart, Atlantic Monthly Press (1920), pages 58–59:
      After that I did take the broom from its place, and I gave the floor a good brooming. I broomed the boards up and down and cross-ways. There was not a speck of dirt on them left.
    • 1997, Will Hobbs, Far North (HarperCollins, →ISBN, page 100:
      We broomed the dirt floor clean with spruce branches, brought our gear inside, and moved in.
  2. (roofing) To improve the embedding of a membrane by using a broom or squeegee to smooth it out and ensure contact with the adhesive under the membrane.
  3. (figuratively) to get rid of someone, like firing an employee or breaking up with a girlfriend, to sweep another out of one's life
    • April 2002 Willem Dafoe as Norman Osborne, speaking to his son Harry, in the film "Spider-Man"
      A word to the "not-so-wise" about your girlfriend. Do what you need to with her, then broom her fast.
    • August 2002 Jeffrey J. Fox How to Become a Great Boss: The Rules for Getting and Keeping the Best Employees page 15
      let the employee leave on his own, or the boss must broom him. If you hire, or inherit, able people, and you groom them, you won't have to broom them. Groom, broom, and watch your company zoom.
    • 2012 George Stevens Jr. Conversations at the American Film Institute with the Great Moviemakers: The Next Generation page 204
      I was still going to go with Breslin until one day he said to me, "I got a confession to make to yo. When my mothe died on her deathbed I promised her I'd never drive a car and I still don't know how to drive a car." I figured for this picture you have to drive a car, so I just decided to broom him and go with an actor.
QuotationsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

broom (third-person singular simple present brooms, present participle brooming, simple past and past participle broomed)

  1. (nautical) Alternative form of bream (to clean a ship's bottom)

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Chemical element
Br
Previous: selenium (Se)
Next: kripton (Kr)

NounEdit

broom (uncountable)

  1. bromine

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl
Chemical element
Br
Previous: seleen (Se)
Next: krypton (Kr)

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French brome. Coined by Antoine-Jérôme Balard.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

broom n (uncountable)

  1. bromine [from mid-19th c.]
    Synonym: bromium

EstonianEdit

 
Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

broom (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. bromine

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.