See also: BRU, brú, and brù

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Afrikaans broer. Doublet of brother, friar, and pal.

NounEdit

bru (plural brus)

  1. (South Africa) bro; bra; term of address for a man
    • 2006, Guy Brown, Hijack!: cracking one of South Africa's most violent carjacking syndicates (page 37)
      "Nice little bonus for you, hey bru," Paul was saying.
    • 2013, Nick Roddy, Out of Jericho (page 200)
      “Listen, bru, don't take this the wrong way, but I grew up with the black man. Never underestimate him and never overestimate him. []

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Frankish *brūn.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bru (feminine bruna, masculine plural bruns, feminine plural brunes)

  1. dark brown

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

bru m (plural bruns)

  1. dark brown

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French bru, brut, from Medieval Latin bruta, from Old High German brūt (daughter-in-law, bride), from Proto-Germanic *brūdiz (bride, daughter-in-law). Akin to Gothic 𐌱𐍂𐌿𐌸𐍃 (brūþs, daughter-in-law), Old English brȳd (bride).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bʁy/
  • (file)

NounEdit

bru f (plural brus)

  1. (regional) daughter-in-law

Usage notesEdit

  • The word is slightly dated in general European French, but current in many regions, including Canada.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

bru

  1. Alternative form of browe

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse brú

NounEdit

bru f or m (definite singular brua or bruen, indefinite plural bruer, definite plural bruene)

  1. a bridge

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse brú.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bru f (definite singular brua, indefinite plural bruer, definite plural bruene)

  1. a bridge
    Dette er den lengste brua i verda.
    This is the longest bridge in the world.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *brūwō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃bʰrúHs (brow).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brū f

  1. an eyelash
  2. an eyebrow

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: browe, broȝ, brou, brow, bru, brouwe, brwe, bruwe
    • English: brow
    • Scots: broo

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

bru f (oblique plural brus, nominative singular bru, nominative plural brus)

  1. daughter-in-law

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (bru, supplement)

PnarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Khasian *bruː. Cognate with Khasi briew. Compare Proto-Khmuic *-brɔʔ (person, man) (whence Khmu [Cuang] cmbrɔʔ), Proto-Katuic *ɓruu (mountain) (whence the autonym Bru), Proto-Vietic *b-ruːʔ (whence Vietnamese ), Santali ᱵᱩᱨᱩ (buru).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bru

  1. person
    u bruman
    uni u bruthis man
    ka bruwoman
    kani ka bruthis woman

PolishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bru m inan

  1. genitive singular of ber

PuyumaEdit

NounEdit

bru

  1. (in females' ritual language) water

SynonymsEdit

  • ənay (general term)
  • nanum (ritual term used by males)

ReferencesEdit

  • Blust's Austronesian Comparative Dictionary