See also: Brut and brût

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French brut (raw), from Middle French brut, from Old French brut, from Latin brūtus (heavy).

AdjectiveEdit

brut (comparative more brut, superlative most brut)

  1. (of champagne) very dry, and not sweet

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin brūtus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brut (feminine bruta, masculine plural bruts, feminine plural brutes)

  1. unrefined, unpurified
  2. dirty
    Synonyms: sutze, llord
    Antonym: net
  3. gross

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DalmatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin brūtus.

AdjectiveEdit

brut (feminine bruta)

  1. ugly
  2. bad

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French brut, from Old French brut, from Latin brūtus (heavy, dull).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bʁyt/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

brut (feminine singular brute, masculine plural bruts, feminine plural brutes)

  1. gross (as opposed to net)
  2. raw
  3. (drinks) strong

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: brut
  • German: brut

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French brut, from Latin brūtus

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brut (not comparable)

  1. brut

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • brut in Duden online

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *brūdiz, whence also Old Saxon brūd, Old English brȳd, Old Norse brúðr,

NounEdit

brūt f

  1. bride

Coordinate termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


VilamovianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brūt n (plural brut) (diminutive brutła)

  1. bread
  2. loaf (of bread)

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse brjóta, from Proto-Germanic *breutaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrewd-. Through vowel-substitution also found as bryt, bryit; compare bruttu.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

brut (preterite bröjt or braut, supine brutti)

  1. (transitive, with å or sånder) to break; to divide abruptly or remove a piece from something by breaking it
    skikkä säg sä, att’n braut å bäinä
    It so happened, that he broke his leg.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit