See also: Bridge and bridgé

English edit

 
A railway bridge (sense 1.1)

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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  • enPR: brĭj, IPA(key): /bɹɪd͡ʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪdʒ

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English brigge, from Old English brycġ (bridge), from Proto-Germanic *brugjō, *brugjǭ (bridge), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerw-, *bʰrēw- (wooden flooring, decking, bridge).

Cognate with Scots brig, brigg, breeg (bridge), Saterland Frisian Brääch (bridge), West Frisian brêge (bridge), Dutch brug (bridge), German Brücke (bridge), Danish brygge (wharf), Icelandic brygga (pier), Gaulish briua (bridge).

The verb is from Middle English briggen, from Old English brycġian (to bridge, make a causeway, pave), derived from the noun. Cognate with Dutch bruggen (to bridge), Middle Low German bruggen (to bridge), Old High German bruccōn (to bridge) (whence Modern German brücken).

The musical connection sense is a semantic loan from German Steg, from Old High German steg.

Noun edit

 
A bridge (sense 1.1)
 
The bridge (sense 2.1) of a warship
 
The bridge (sense 2.2) of a violin

bridge (plural bridges)

  1. A construction or natural feature that spans a divide.
    1. A construction spanning a waterway, ravine, or valley from an elevated height, allowing for the passage of vehicles, pedestrians, trains, etc.
      The rope bridge crosses the river.
      • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter VIII, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., →OCLC:
        Now we plunged into a deep shade with the boughs lacing each other overhead, and crossed dainty, rustic bridges over the cold trout-streams, the boards giving back the clatter of our horses' feet: or anon we shot into a clearing, with a colored glimpse of the lake and its curving shore far below us.
      • 2013 June 29, “High and wet”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 28:
        Floods in northern India, mostly in the small state of Uttarakhand, have wrought disaster on an enormous scale. The early, intense onset of the monsoon on June 14th swelled rivers, washing away roads, bridges, hotels and even whole villages. Rock-filled torrents smashed vehicles and homes, burying victims under rubble and sludge.
    2. (anatomy) The upper bony ridge of the human nose.
      Rugby players often break the bridge of their noses.
    3. (dentistry) A prosthesis replacing one or several adjacent teeth.
      The dentist pulled out the decayed tooth and put in a bridge.
    4. (bowling) The gap between the holes on a bowling ball
  2. An arch or superstructure.
    1. (nautical) An elevated platform above the upper deck of a mechanically propelled ship from which it is navigated and from which all activities on deck can be seen and controlled by the captain, etc; smaller ships have a wheelhouse, and sailing ships were controlled from a quarterdeck.
      The first officer is on the bridge.
    2. (music, lutherie) The piece, on string instruments, that supports the strings from the sounding board.
    3. (billiards, snooker, pool) A particular form of one hand placed on the table to support the cue when making a shot in cue sports.
    4. (billiards, snooker, pool) A cue modified with a convex arch-shaped notched head attached to the narrow end, used to support a player's (shooter's) cue for extended or tedious shots. Also called a spider.
    5. Anything supported at the ends and serving to keep some other thing from resting upon the object spanned, as in engraving, watchmaking, etc., or which forms a platform or staging over which something passes or is conveyed.
    6. (wrestling) A defensive position in which the wrestler is supported by his feet and head, belly-up, in order to prevent touch-down of the shoulders and eventually to dislodge an opponent who has established a position on top.
    7. (gymnastics) A similar position in gymnastics.
  3. A connection, real or abstract.
    • 1964, Harry S. Truman, 0:18 from the start, in MP2002-479 Former President Truman Recalls Negotiating With DeGaulle and France after WWII[1], Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum, National Archives Identifier: 595162:
      Yes, France is geographically situated in a key position so far as Western Europe is concerned. They are really the bridge between Germany, Spain and Italy. And it was necessary to have a NATO organization that was unified and France was a necessary member of that organization.
    1. (medicine) A rudimentary procedure before definite solution
      ECMO is used as a bridge to surgery to stabilize the patient.
    2. (computing) A device which connects two or more computer buses, typically in a transparent manner.
      This chip is the bridge between the front-side bus and the I/O bus.
    3. (programming) A software component connecting two or more separate systems.
      • 2011, Thord Daniel Hedengren, Smashing WordPress Themes: Making WordPress Beautiful:
        The plugin also acts as a bridge with BuddyPress and adds things like the top admin bar, and so on.
    4. (networking) A system which connects two or more local area networks at layer 2 of OSI model.
      The LAN bridge uses a spanning tree algorithm.
    5. (chemistry) An intramolecular valence bond, atom or chain of atoms that connects two different parts of a molecule; the atoms so connected being bridgeheads.
    6. (electronics) An unintended solder connection between two or more components or pins.
    7. (music) A contrasting section within a song that prepares for the return of the original material section.
      The lyrics in the song's bridge inverted its meaning.
      In the bridge of his 2011 song "It Will Rain", Bruno Mars begs his lover not to "say goodbye."
    8. (graph theory) An edge which, if removed, changes a connected graph to one that is not connected.
    9. (poetry) A point in a line where a break in a word unit cannot occur.
    10. (diplomacy) A statement, such as an offer, that signals a possibility of accord.
    11. A day falling between two public holidays and consequently designated as an additional holiday.
    12. (biology) In turtles, the connection between the plastron and the carapace.
  4. (electronics) Any of several electrical devices that measure characteristics such as impedance and inductance by balancing different parts of a circuit
  5. A low wall or vertical partition in the fire chamber of a furnace, for deflecting flame, etc.; a bridge wall.
  6. (cycling) The situation where a lone rider or small group of riders closes the space between them and the rider or group in front.
  7. A solid crust of undissolved salt in a water softener.
  8. (roller derby) An elongated chain of teammates, connected to the pack, for improved blocking potential.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

bridge (third-person singular simple present bridges, present participle bridging, simple past and past participle bridged)

  1. To be or make a bridge over something.
    With enough cable, we can bridge this gorge.
    • 1947 January and February, H. A. Vallance, “The Sea Wall at Dawlish”, in Railway Magazine, page 18:
      On this occasion, the damage was far more serious. The sea wall was breached completely for a distance of over 50 yd., and the gap had to be bridged by a temporary timber viaduct.
  2. To span as if with a bridge.
    The two groups were able to bridge their differences.
    • 2012, Christoper Zara, Tortured Artists: From Picasso and Monroe to Warhol and Winehouse, the Twisted Secrets of the World's Most Creative Minds, part 1, chapter 1, 28:
      The brooding, black-clad singer bridged a stark divide that emerged in the recording industry in the 1950s, as post-Elvis pop singers diverged into two camps and audiences aligned themselves with either the sideburned rebels of rock 'n' roll or the cowboy-hatted twangsters of country music.
  3. (music) To transition from one piece or section of music to another without stopping.
    We need to bridge that jam into "The Eleven".
  4. (computing, communication) To connect two or more computer buses, networks etc. with a bridge.
  5. (wrestling) To go to the bridge position.
  6. (roller derby) To employ the bridge tactic. (See Noun section.)
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From the earlier game biritch, probably from Russian бирю́ч (birjúč) or бири́ч (biríč); else from Turkish bir-üç (one-three).[1][2]

Noun edit

bridge (uncountable)

  1. (card games) A card game played with four players playing as two teams of two players each.
    Bidding is an essential element of the game of bridge.
Translations edit

References edit

  1. ^ "bridge." *OED 2nd edition. 1989. (online)
  2. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024), “bridge”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams edit

Basque edit

 
Basque Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eu

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun edit

bridge ?

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Catalan edit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun edit

bridge m (plural bridges)

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Danish edit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology edit

From English bridge.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /britsj/, [ˈb̥ʁid̥ɕ]

Noun edit

bridge c (singular definite bridgen, not used in plural form)

  1. bridge (a card game)

Declension edit

Dutch edit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bridge.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /brɪdʒ/ (/r/ may be realised as [ɹ])
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: bridge

Noun edit

bridge n (uncountable)

  1. bridge (card game)

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Faroese edit

Etymology edit

From English bridge.

Noun edit

bridge ?

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Finnish edit

 
Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fi

Etymology edit

From English bridge.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbridɡe/, [ˈbridɡe̞]
  • Rhymes: -idɡe
  • Syllabification(key): brid‧ge

Noun edit

bridge

  1. (card games) bridge

Declension edit

Inflection of bridge (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative bridge bridget
genitive bridgen bridgejen
partitive bridgeä bridgejä
illative bridgeen bridgeihin
singular plural
nominative bridge bridget
accusative nom. bridge bridget
gen. bridgen
genitive bridgen bridgejen
bridgeinrare
partitive bridgeä bridgejä
inessive bridgessä bridgeissä
elative bridgestä bridgeistä
illative bridgeen bridgeihin
adessive bridgellä bridgeillä
ablative bridgeltä bridgeiltä
allative bridgelle bridgeille
essive bridgenä bridgeinä
translative bridgeksi bridgeiksi
abessive bridgettä bridgeittä
instructive bridgein
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of bridge (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative bridgeni bridgeni
accusative nom. bridgeni bridgeni
gen. bridgeni
genitive bridgeni bridgejeni
bridgeinirare
partitive bridgeäni bridgejäni
inessive bridgessäni bridgeissäni
elative bridgestäni bridgeistäni
illative bridgeeni bridgeihini
adessive bridgelläni bridgeilläni
ablative bridgeltäni bridgeiltäni
allative bridgelleni bridgeilleni
essive bridgenäni bridgeinäni
translative bridgekseni bridgeikseni
abessive bridgettäni bridgeittäni
instructive
comitative bridgeineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative bridgesi bridgesi
accusative nom. bridgesi bridgesi
gen. bridgesi
genitive bridgesi bridgejesi
bridgeisirare
partitive bridgeäsi bridgejäsi
inessive bridgessäsi bridgeissäsi
elative bridgestäsi bridgeistäsi
illative bridgeesi bridgeihisi
adessive bridgelläsi bridgeilläsi
ablative bridgeltäsi bridgeiltäsi
allative bridgellesi bridgeillesi
essive bridgenäsi bridgeinäsi
translative bridgeksesi bridgeiksesi
abessive bridgettäsi bridgeittäsi
instructive
comitative bridgeinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative bridgemme bridgemme
accusative nom. bridgemme bridgemme
gen. bridgemme
genitive bridgemme bridgejemme
bridgeimmerare
partitive bridgeämme bridgejämme
inessive bridgessämme bridgeissämme
elative bridgestämme bridgeistämme
illative bridgeemme bridgeihimme
adessive bridgellämme bridgeillämme
ablative bridgeltämme bridgeiltämme
allative bridgellemme bridgeillemme
essive bridgenämme bridgeinämme
translative bridgeksemme bridgeiksemme
abessive bridgettämme bridgeittämme
instructive
comitative bridgeinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative bridgenne bridgenne
accusative nom. bridgenne bridgenne
gen. bridgenne
genitive bridgenne bridgejenne
bridgeinnerare
partitive bridgeänne bridgejänne
inessive bridgessänne bridgeissänne
elative bridgestänne bridgeistänne
illative bridgeenne bridgeihinne
adessive bridgellänne bridgeillänne
ablative bridgeltänne bridgeiltänne
allative bridgellenne bridgeillenne
essive bridgenänne bridgeinänne
translative bridgeksenne bridgeiksenne
abessive bridgettänne bridgeittänne
instructive
comitative bridgeinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative bridgensä bridgensä
accusative nom. bridgensä bridgensä
gen. bridgensä
genitive bridgensä bridgejensä
bridgeinsärare
partitive bridgeään
bridgeänsä
bridgejään
bridgejänsä
inessive bridgessään
bridgessänsä
bridgeissään
bridgeissänsä
elative bridgestään
bridgestänsä
bridgeistään
bridgeistänsä
illative bridgeensä bridgeihinsä
adessive bridgellään
bridgellänsä
bridgeillään
bridgeillänsä
ablative bridgeltään
bridgeltänsä
bridgeiltään
bridgeiltänsä
allative bridgelleen
bridgellensä
bridgeilleen
bridgeillensä
essive bridgenään
bridgenänsä
bridgeinään
bridgeinänsä
translative bridgekseen
bridgeksensä
bridgeikseen
bridgeiksensä
abessive bridgettään
bridgettänsä
bridgeittään
bridgeittänsä
instructive
comitative bridgeineen
bridgeinensä

Compounds edit

Further reading edit

French edit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology edit

From English bridge.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bridge m (uncountable)

  1. (card games) bridge
  2. (dentistry, France) bridge
    Synonym: (Canada) pont

Further reading edit

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun edit

bridge (first-person possessive bridgeku, second-person possessive bridgemu, third-person possessive bridgenya)

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Italian edit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bridge.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bridge m (invariable)

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ bridge in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Limburgish edit

 
Limburgish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia li

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun edit

bridge ?

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology edit

From English bridge.

Noun edit

bridge m (definite singular bridgen, uncountable)

  1. bridge (card game)

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology edit

From English bridge.

Noun edit

bridge m (definite singular bridgen, uncountable)

  1. (card games) bridge

References edit

Portuguese edit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English bridge.

Pronunciation edit

 

Noun edit

bridge m (uncountable)

  1. (card games) bridge

Romanian edit

 
Romanian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ro

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English bridge.

Noun edit

bridge n (plural bridge-uri)

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)
  2. a game of bridge

Declension edit

Saterland Frisian edit

 
Saterland Frisian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia stq

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun edit

bridge ? (plural [please provide])

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Sicilian edit

 
Sicilian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia scn

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bridge.

Noun edit

bridge ?

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Spanish edit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bridge.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bridge m (uncountable)

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Etymology edit

From English.

Noun edit

bridge c

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)

Declension edit

Declension of bridge 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative bridge bridgen
Genitive bridges bridgens

Derived terms edit

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bridge.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bridge m

  1. (card games) bridge (card game)