See also: brumé and brumë

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French brume, from Latin brūma (winter solstice; winter; winter cold). Brūma is derived from brevima, brevissima (shortest), the superlative of brevis (brief; short) (the winter solstice being the shortest day of the year), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *mréǵʰus (brief, short).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɹuːm/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːm

NounEdit

brume (countable and uncountable, plural brumes)

  1. (literary) Mist, fog, vapour.
    • 1972, All around their bubble of stupidity I could feel the brume of the dragon. — John Gardner, Grendel (André Deutsch 1972, p. 77)

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French brume, borrowed from Latin brūma (winter), possibly through the intermediate of Old Occitan bruma.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brume f (plural brumes)

  1. mist, haze, fog

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: brume

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

brume f

  1. plural of bruma

AnagramsEdit