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EnglishEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for busk in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French busc, by dissimilation (from buste) from Italian busto.

NounEdit

busk (plural busks)

  1. A strip of metal, whalebone, wood, or other material, worn in the front of a corset to stiffen it.
    • Marston
      Her long slit sleeves, stiff busk, puff verdingall, / Is all that makes her thus angelical.
  2. (by extension) A corset.
    • 1661, John Donne, "To his Mistress going to Bed":
      Off with that happy busk, which I envie, / That still can be, and still can stand so nigh.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Etymology unknown

NounEdit

busk (plural busks)

  1. (obsolete) A kind of linen.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 4, p. 557:
      Busk, a kind of table linen, occurs first in 1458, and occasionally afterwards.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English busken, from Old Norse búask

VerbEdit

busk (third-person singular simple present busks, present participle busking, simple past and past participle busked)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To prepare; to make ready; to array; to dress.
    • Hamilton
      Busk you, busk you, my bonny, bonny bride.
    • Fairfax
      The watch stert up and drew their weapons bright / And busk'd them bold to battle and to fight.
  2. (obsolete) To go; to direct one's course.
    • Skelton
      Ye might have busked you to Huntly banks.

Etymology 4Edit

Apparently from French busquer or Spanish buscar.

VerbEdit

busk (third-person singular simple present busks, present participle busking, simple past and past participle busked)

  1. (intransitive) To solicit money by entertaining the public in the street or in public transport
  2. (nautical) To tack, cruise about.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse buskr, from Proto-Germanic *buskaz.

NounEdit

busk c (singular definite busken, plural indefinite buske)

  1. bush

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no
 
busk

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse buskr, from Proto-Germanic *buskaz. Compare with Danish busk, Swedish buske, Icelandic búskur, English bush, Dutch bos, German Busch.

NounEdit

busk m (definite singular busken, indefinite plural busker, definite plural buskene)

  1. a bush or shrub

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse buskr, from Proto-Germanic *buskaz. See above for comparisons,

NounEdit

busk m (definite singular busken, indefinite plural buskar, definite plural buskane)

  1. a bush or shrub

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *buskaz, probably from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to grow). Compare Old Saxon busk, Old English busc, bysc, Old Norse buskr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

busk m

  1. bush

DescendantsEdit