EnglishEdit

 
Two loaves of bread (1).
 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bred, breed, from Old English brēad (fragment, bit, morsel, crumb", also "bread), from Proto-Germanic *braudą (cooked food, leavened bread), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerw-, *bʰrew- (to boil, seethe) (see brew). Alternatively, from Proto-Germanic *braudaz, *brauþaz (broken piece, fragment), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰera- (to split, beat, hew, struggle) (see brittle). Perhaps a conflation of the two.

Cognate with Scots breid (bread), Saterland Frisian Brad (bread), West Frisian brea (bread), Dutch brood (bread), German Brot (bread), Danish and Norwegian brød (bread), Swedish bröd (bread), Icelandic brauð (bread), Albanian brydh (I make crumbly, friable, soft), Latin frustum (crumb).

NounEdit

bread (countable and uncountable, plural breads)

  1. (uncountable) A foodstuff made by baking dough made from cereals.
    We made sandwiches with the bread we bought from the bakery.
    any leftover bread can be put into the pudding.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 8, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Philander went into the next room [] and came back with a salt mackerel that dripped brine like a rainstorm. Then he put the coffee pot on the stove and rummaged out a loaf of dry bread and some hardtack.
  2. (countable) Any variety of bread.
  3. (slang, US) Money.
    • 1973, Billy Joel (lyrics and music), “Piano Man”, performed by Billy Joel:
      And they sit at the bar and put bread in my jar
      And say, "Man, what are you doing here?"
    • 2005, Jordan Houston, Darnell Carlton, Paul Beauregard, Premro Smith, Marlon Goodwin, David Brown, and Willie Hutchinson (lyrics), “Stay Fly”, in Most Known Unknown[1], Sony BMG, performed by Three 6 Mafia (featuring Young Buck, 8 Ball, and MJG):
      Tastes like fruit when you hit it; got to have bread to get it.
  4. Food; sustenance; support of life, in general.
Usage notesEdit
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Sranan Tongo: brede
  • Fiji Hindi: bareed
TranslationsEdit
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VerbEdit

bread (third-person singular simple present breads, present participle breading, simple past and past participle breaded)

  1. (transitive) to coat with breadcrumbs
    breaded fish
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English brede, from Old English brǣdu (breadth, width, extent), from Proto-Germanic *braidį̄ (breadth). Cognate with Scots brede, breid (breadth), Dutch breedte (breadth), German Breite (breadth), Swedish bredd (breadth), Icelandic breidd (breadth).

NounEdit

bread (plural breads)

  1. (obsolete or Britain dialectal, Scotland) Breadth.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English breden, from Old English brǣdan (to make broad, extend, spread, stretch out; be extended, rise, grow), from Proto-Germanic *braidijaną (to make broad, broaden).

VerbEdit

bread (third-person singular simple present breads, present participle breading, simple past and past participle breaded)

  1. (transitive, dialectal) To make broad; spread.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ray to this entry?)

Etymology 4Edit

Variant of braid, from Middle English breden, from Old English brēdan, breġdan (to braid).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

bread (third-person singular simple present breads, present participle breading, simple past and past participle breaded)

  1. (transitive) To form in meshes; net.

NounEdit

bread (plural breads)

  1. A piece of embroidery; a braid.

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *braudą, whence also Old Frisian brād (West Frisian brea), Old Saxon brōd (German Low German Broot, Brot), Dutch brood, Old High German brōt (German Brot), Old Norse brauð and Icelandic brauð (Swedish bröd).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brēad n (nominative plural brēadru) (rare, chiefly Anglian)

  1. bit, piece, morsel, crumb
  2. bread (foodstuff)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

bread

  1. (Spain) Informal second-person plural (vosotros or vosotras) affirmative imperative form of brear.