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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French cadet, from Gascon Occitan capdet, from Latin capitellum, diminutive of caput (head). Attested in English from 1634.[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cadet (plural cadets)

  1. A student at a military school who is training to be an officer.
  2. (largely historical) A younger or youngest son, who would not inherit as a firstborn son would.
  3. (in compounds, chiefly in genealogy) Junior. (See also the heraldic term cadency.)
    a cadet branch of the family
  4. (archaic, US, slang) A young man who makes a business of ruining girls to put them in brothels.
  5. (New Zealand, historical) A young gentleman learning sheep farming at a station; also, any young man attached to a sheep station.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ cadet” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  2. ^ cadet” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ka.dɛ/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

cadet (feminine singular cadette, masculine plural cadets, feminine plural cadettes)

  1. (family) youngest
    le fils cadet
    the youngest son

NounEdit

cadet m (plural cadets)

  1. cadet, student officer
  2. junior sportsperson, young player
  3. a younger sibling

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit