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See also: Cadet

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French cadet, from Gascon Occitan capdet, from Latin capitellum, diminutive of caput (head). Attested in English from 1634.[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cadet (plural cadets)

  1. A student at a military school who is training to be an officer.
  2. (largely historical) A younger or youngest son, who would not inherit as a firstborn son would.
  3. (in compounds, chiefly in genealogy) Junior. (See also the heraldic term cadency.)
    a cadet branch of the family
  4. (archaic, US, slang) A young man who makes a business of ruining girls to put them in brothels.
  5. (New Zealand, historical) A young gentleman learning sheep farming at a station; also, any young man attached to a sheep station.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ cadet” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  2. ^ cadet” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cadet (feminine singular cadette, masculine plural cadets, feminine plural cadettes)

  1. (family) youngest
    le fils cadet
    the youngest son

NounEdit

cadet m (plural cadets)

  1. cadet, student officer
  2. junior sportsperson, young player
  3. a younger sibling

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit