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EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French cale.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caul ‎(plural cauls)

  1. (historical) A style of close-fitting circular cap worn by women in the sixteenth century and later, often made of linen. [from 14th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.vii:
      Ne spared they to strip her naked all. / Then when they had despoild her tire and call, / Such as she was, their eyes might her behold []
  2. (anatomy, obsolete except in specific senses) A membrane. [14th-17th c.]
  3. The thin membrane which covers the lower intestines; the omentum. [from 14th c.]
  4. The amnion which encloses the foetus before birth, especially that part of it which sometimes shrouds a baby’s head at birth (traditionally considered to be good luck). [from 16th c.]
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society (2012), page 182:
      Even in the mid seventeenth century a country gentleman might regard his caul as a treasure to be preserved with great care, and bequeathed to his descendants.
  5. The surface of a press that makes contact with panel product, especially a removable plate or sheet.
  6. (woodworking) A strip or block of wood used to distribute or direct clamping force.
  7. (cooking) Caul fat.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin caulis.

NounEdit

caul

  1. cabbage
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