See also: Stream

English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
Gustave Courbet's Le ruisseau de la Brême (The Brême Stream, 1866)

Etymology

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From Middle English streem, strem, from Old English strēam, from Proto-West Germanic *straum, from Proto-Germanic *straumaz (stream), from Proto-Indo-European *srowmos (river), from Proto-Indo-European *srew- (to flow). Doublet of rheum.

Cognate with Scots strem, streme, streym (stream, river), North Frisian strum (stream), West Frisian stream (stream), Low German Stroom (stream), Dutch stroom (current, flow, stream), German Strom (current, stream), Danish and Norwegian Bokmål strøm (current, stream, flow), Norwegian Nynorsk straum (current, stream, flow), Swedish ström (current, stream, flow), Icelandic straumur (current, stream, torrent, flood), Ancient Greek ῥεῦμα (rheûma, stream, flow), Lithuanian srovė (current, stream) Polish strumień (stream), Welsh ffrwd (stream, current), Scottish Gaelic sruth (stream).

Pronunciation

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  • enPR: strēm, IPA(key): /stɹiːm/
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -iːm

Noun

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

stream (plural streams)

  1. A small river; a large creek; a body of moving water confined by banks.
  2. A thin connected passing of a liquid through a lighter gas (e.g. air).
    He poured the milk in a thin stream from the jug to the glass.
  3. Any steady flow or succession of material, such as water, air, radio signal or words.
    Her constant nagging was to him a stream of abuse.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 10, in The China Governess: A Mystery, London: Chatto & Windus, →OCLC:
      With a little manœuvring they contrived to meet on the doorstep which was [] in a boiling stream of passers-by, hurrying business people speeding past in a flurry of fumes and dust in the bright haze.
    • 2011 December 21, Helen Pidd, “Europeans migrate south as continent drifts deeper into crisis”, in the Guardian[2]:
      A new stream of migrants is leaving the continent. It threatens to become a torrent if the debt crisis continues to worsen.
  4. (sciences, umbrella term) All moving waters.
  5. (figurative) A particular path, channel, division, or way of proceeding.
    Haredi Judaism is a stream of Orthodox Judaism characterized by rejection of modern secular culture.
  6. (computing) A source or repository of data that can be read or written only sequentially.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  7. Digital data (e.g. music or video) delivered in a continuous manner to a client computer, intended for immediate consumption or playback.
    1. An instance of streaming digital data.
      • 2023 May 3, Courtney Young, “13 Shows to Binge When ‘Succession’ Ends”, in Cosmopolitan[3]:
        If your favorite Succession storylines involve the fictional ATN and network drama, give Apple TV’s The Morning Show a stream.
    2. A live stream.
  8. (UK, education) A division of a school year by perceived ability.
    All of the bright kids went into the A stream, but I was in the B stream.

Synonyms

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Hyponyms

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Finnish: striimi (live stream)

Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb

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stream (third-person singular simple present streams, present participle streaming, simple past and past participle streamed)

  1. (intransitive) To flow in a continuous or steady manner, like a liquid.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book VII”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker []; [a]nd by Robert Boulter []; [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
      beneath those banks where rivers now stream
    • [1898], J[ohn] Meade Falkner, Moonfleet (Arnold’s English Literature Series), London: Edward Arnold & Co., →OCLC:
      When I came to myself I was lying, not in the outer blackness of the Mohune vault, not on a floor of sand; but in a bed of sweet clean linen, and in a little whitewashed room, through the window of which the spring sunlight streamed.
  2. (intransitive) To extend; to stretch out with a wavy motion; to float in the wind.
    A flag streams in the wind.
  3. (transitive) To discharge in a stream.
    The soldier's wound was streaming blood.
  4. (Internet) To push continuous data (e.g. music) from a server to a client computer while it is being used (played) on the client.
  5. (Internet) To livestream.
    • 2024 March 1, F1NN5TER, 1:40 from the start, in Coming Out[4], archived from the original on 14 May 2024:
      I did factor in the whole, like, "oh, I wonder if doing streaming, and the money that's kind of attached to it, is the reason I wanted to do this?", like, is it warping my brain? I did think about that. I've streamed for years and it's been my entire life and I've made a lot of money off it, and I wondered if that's what's affecting me and making me want to do this. And it's not.

Derived terms

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further reading

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Anagrams

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Dutch

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English stream.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /striːm/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: stream

Noun

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stream m (plural streams)

  1. (computing, Internet) A stream.
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French

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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stream m (plural streams)

  1. (Internet) stream

Old English

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *straum.

Germanic cognates include Old Frisian strām, Old Saxon strōm, Old High German stroum, Old Norse straumr. Extra-Germanic cognates include Ancient Greek ῥεῦμα (rheûma), Polish strumień, Albanian rrymë (flow, current).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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strēam m

  1. stream
  2. current

Declension

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Descendants

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See also

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Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

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Unadapted borrowing from English stream. First attested in 1993.[1]

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /strim/
  • Rhymes: -im
  • Syllabification: stream

Noun

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stream m inan

  1. (Internet) stream, live stream

Declension

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Derived terms

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noun

References

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  1. ^ Pęzik, Piotr, Przepiórkowski, A., Bańko, M., Górski, R., Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, B (2012) Wyszukiwarka PELCRA dla danych NKJP. Narodowy Korpus Języka Polskiego [National Polish Language Corpus, PELCRA search engine]‎[1], Wydawnictwo PWN

Further reading

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  • stream in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • stream at Obserwatorium językowe Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego

Spanish

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Etymology

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Unadapted borrowing from English stream.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈstɾim/ [ˈst̪ɾĩm]
  • IPA(key): (adapted) /esˈtɾim/ [esˈt̪ɾĩm]

Noun

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stream m (plural streams)

  1. (computing) stream

Usage notes

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According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.

West Frisian

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Etymology

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From Old Frisian strām, from Proto-West Germanic *straum.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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stream c (plural streamen, diminutive streamke)

  1. river
    Synonym: rivier
  2. stream (of fluids), flow
  3. electric current

Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • stream”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011