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See also: çavuş

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cavus.

NounEdit

cavus (uncountable)

  1. (geology) In planetary geology, it is used to refer to irregular steep-sided depressions that do not seem to be impact craters.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *kawos, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱowHós (hollow), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱewH- (to swell). Related to Old Irish cúas (hollow, cavity), Tocharian B kor (throat), Albanian cup (odd, uneven), Ancient Greek κύαρ (kúar, eye of needle, earhole), Old Armenian սոր (sor, hole), Sanskrit शून्य (śūnya, empty, barren, zero).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cavus (feminine cava, neuter cavum, comparative cavior); first/second-declension adjective

  1. hollow, concave
  2. excavated, channeled

DeclensionEdit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative cavus cava cavum cavī cavae cava
Genitive cavī cavae cavī cavōrum cavārum cavōrum
Dative cavō cavō cavīs
Accusative cavum cavam cavum cavōs cavās cava
Ablative cavō cavā cavō cavīs
Vocative cave cava cavum cavī cavae cava

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

cavus m (genitive cavī); second declension

  1. Alternative form of cavum

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cavus cavī
Genitive cavī cavōrum
Dative cavō cavīs
Accusative cavum cavōs
Ablative cavō cavīs
Vocative cave cavī

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit