See also: câu, cầu, cấu, cẩu, čau, cậu, and ĉaŭ

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin cavum, cavus, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱówHwos (cavity).

NounEdit

cau m (plural caus)

  1. den; burrow; lair
  2. (by extension) hiding place
  3. (figuratively) sty; hovel

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From the verb caure (to fall).

VerbEdit

cau

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of caure
  2. second-person singular imperative form of caure

KanakanabuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Austronesian *Cau. Cognates with Tagalog tao, Cebuano tawo.

NounEdit

cau

  1. person

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cavus.

AdjectiveEdit

cau m (feminine singular cava, masculine plural caus, feminine plural cavas)

  1. hollow

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Vietic *kaw.

NounEdit

(classifier cây, trái) cau (, , , , 𥢐)

  1. areca
    Synonym: nang

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

cau (, , 󰎹)

  1. to frown
Derived termsEdit
Derived terms

WelshEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Celtic *kageti, from Proto-Indo-European *kagʰ- (catch, grasp) (compare Oscan 𐌊𐌀𐌇𐌀𐌃 (kahad, may he take), Albanian kam (to have, hold).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cau (first-person singular present caeaf)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to close, shut
  2. (transitive) to fasten
  3. (intransitive) to heal, to close
ConjugationEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
  • cae (enclosure, field)
  • caer (castle, hold)

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Welsh keu, from Proto-Brythonic, from Proto-Celtic *kuwo-, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱowHós (hollow), from *ḱewH- (to swell).

Cognate with Cornish kow, Breton kev.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cau (feminine singular cau, plural ceuon, equative ceued, comparative ceuach, superlative ceuaf)

  1. hollow, empty, sunken
  2. (figuratively) false, deceitful
  3. enclosing; shut, closed
AntonymsEdit
Related termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cau gau nghau chau
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “cau”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies