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See also: irregulär

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French irreguler, from Medieval Latin or Late Latin irrēgulāris, from in- + regularis, equivalent to ir- +‎ regular.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

irregular (comparative more irregular, superlative most irregular)

  1. nonstandard; not conforming to rules or expectations
    • 1967, Sleigh, Barbara, Jessamy, 1993 edition, Sevenoaks, Kent: Bloomsbury, →ISBN, page 33:
      ‘ “It would be most irregular Grandpa!” says Miss Cecily frowning and tapping her foot. “Well, we’re a pretty irregular family so that’s neither here nor there,” says the old man, impish like. [...] ’
  2. (of a surface) rough
  3. without symmetry, regularity, or uniformity
    • 1944, Miles Burton, chapter 5, in The Three Corpse Trick:
      The hovel stood in the centre of what had once been a vegetable garden, but was now a patch of rank weeds. Surrounding this, almost like a zareba, was an irregular ring of gorse and brambles, an unclaimed vestige of the original common.
    • 2013 January 1, Paul Bartel, Ashli Moore, “Avian Migration: The Ultimate Red-Eye Flight”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 1, page 47–48:
      Many of these classic methods are still used, with some modern improvements. For example, with the aid of special microphones and automated sound detection software, ornithologists recently reported […] that pine siskins (Spinus pinus) undergo an irregular, nomadic type of nocturnal migration.
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, “Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34:
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.
  4. (geometry, of a polygon) not regular; having sides that are not equal or angles that are not equal
  5. (geometry, of a polyhedron) whose faces are not all regular polygons (or are not equally inclined to each other)
  6. (grammar, of a word) not following the regular or expected patterns of inflection in a given language
    "Calves", "cacti", and "children" are irregular plurals.
    I hate learning all the irregular conjugations in French.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

irregular (plural irregulars)

  1. a soldier who is not a member of an official military force and, often, does not follow regular army tactics
  2. one who does not regularly attend a venue
    • 2015, Brian Cook, Hands Across The Sea (page 190)
      There's one neighborhood tavern where the regulars and irregulars go after a hard day to unlax and rewind, throw back a few, and just hang out - you know the one.

TranslationsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin irrēgulāris.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

irregular (masculine and feminine plural irregulars)

  1. irregular
    Antonym: regular

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin irrēgulāris.

AdjectiveEdit

irregular m or f (plural irregulares)

  1. irregular

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin irrēgulāris.

AdjectiveEdit

irregular m or f (plural irregulares, comparable)

  1. irregular; nonstandard
  2. (grammar) irregular (not following an inflectional paradigm)

AntonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin irrēgulāris.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ireɡuˈlaɾ/, [ireɣuˈlaɾ]

AdjectiveEdit

irregular (plural irregulares)

  1. irregular
    Antonym: regular