Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French colossal, formed from Latin colossus, from Ancient Greek κολοσσός (kolossós, giant statue).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kəˈlɒsəl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

colossal (comparative more colossal, superlative most colossal)

  1. Extremely large or on a great scale.
    • 2013 June 22, “Engineers of a different kind”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 70:
      Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. [] Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster. Clever financial ploys are what have made billionaires of the industry’s veterans. “Operational improvement” in a portfolio company has often meant little more than promising colossal bonuses to sitting chief executives if they meet ambitious growth targets. That model is still prevalent today.
    A single puppy can make a colossal mess.
    • 2017 April 23, John Oliver, “Ivanka & Jared”, in Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, season 4, episode 10, HBO:
      What is wrong with you, you colossal fucking creep⁉ You found the only possible wrong answer to that question! “What’s your favorite color? Hitler.”

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Formed from Latin colossus, from Ancient Greek κολοσσός (kolossós) (originally used by Herodotus in reference to statues in ancient Egyptian temples).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

colossal (feminine singular colossale, masculine plural colossaux, feminine plural colossales)

  1. colossal, huge

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From colosso +‎ -al.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

colossal m, f (plural colossais, comparable)

  1. colossal (extremely large)

SynonymsEdit