conjurer

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman conjurour.

NounEdit

conjurer (plural conjurers, feminine conjuress)

  1. One who conjures, a magician.
    • July 18 2012, Scott Tobias, AV Club The Dark Knight Rises[1]
      With his crude potato-sack mask and fear-inducing toxins, The Scarecrow, a “psychopharmacologist” at an insane asylum, acts as a conjurer of nightmares, capable of turning his patients’ most terrifying anxieties against them.
    • 1594 His incivility confirms no less. Good Doctor Pinch, you are a conjurer; Establish him in his true sense again, And I will please you what you will demand. — Shakespeare, A Comedy of Errors, Act 4, Scene 4.
  2. One who performs parlor tricks, sleight of hand.
    • 1893 The man is by trade a conjurer and performer, going round the canteens after nightfall, and giving a little entertainment at each. — Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of the Crooked Man".
  3. One who conjures; one who calls, entreats, or charges in a solemn manner.
  4. (obsolete) One who conjectures shrewdly or judges wisely; a man of sagacity.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)
  5. A cooking appliance comprising a pot (large or small) with a gridiron wielded beneath it, like a brazier, used for cooking methods such as broiling.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

conjurer

  1. to beseech, to beg
    Je vous en conjure !
    I beseech you!
  2. to ward off
  3. to conspire, to plot, to conjure
  4. (magic) to conjure

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

conjurer

  1. to beseech, to beg

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.