conjurer

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English conjurer, from Anglo-Norman conjurour (conjurer, conspirator). Equivalent to conjure +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkʌndʒəɹə(ɹ)/
  • (file)

NounEdit

conjurer (plural conjurers, feminine conjuress)

  1. One who conjures, a magician.
    • July 18 2012, Scott Tobias, AV Club The Dark Knight Rises[1]
      With his crude potato-sack mask and fear-inducing toxins, The Scarecrow, a “psychopharmacologist” at an insane asylum, acts as a conjurer of nightmares, capable of turning his patients’ most terrifying anxieties against them.
    • 1594 His incivility confirms no less. Good Doctor Pinch, you are a conjurer; Establish him in his true sense again, And I will please you what you will demand. — Shakespeare, A Comedy of Errors, Act 4, Scene 4.
  2. One who performs parlor tricks, sleight of hand.
    • 1893 The man is by trade a conjurer and performer, going round the canteens after nightfall, and giving a little entertainment at each. — Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of the Crooked Man".
  3. One who conjures; one who calls, entreats, or charges in a solemn manner.
  4. (obsolete) One who conjectures shrewdly or judges wisely; a man of sagacity.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)
  5. A cooking appliance comprising a pot (large or small) with a gridiron wielded beneath it, like a brazier, used for cooking methods such as broiling.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

conjurer

  1. to beseech, to beg
    Je vous en conjure !
    I beseech you!
  2. to ward off
  3. to conspire, to plot, to conjure
  4. (magic) to conjure

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman conjurour; equivalent to conjuren +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌkunˈdʒiu̯rɛːr(ə)/, /ˌkunˈdʒiu̯rər(ə)/, /ˈkundʒəˌrɛːr(ə)/, /ˈkundʒərər(ə)/

NounEdit

conjurer

  1. conjurer, magician
  2. exorcist

DescendantsEdit

  • English: conjurer, conjuror

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

conjurer

  1. to beseech, to beg

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.