correspond

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French correspondre, from Latin com- (with) + respondeo (to match, to answer to)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

correspond (third-person singular simple present corresponds, present participle corresponding, simple past and past participle corresponded)

  1. (intransitive, constructed with to) To be equivalent or similar in character, quantity, quality, origin, structure, function etc.
  2. (intransitive, constructed with with) to exchange messages, especially by postal letter, over a period of time.
    I've been corresponding with my German pen pal for three years.
  3. (obsolete) To have sex with.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol. III, ch. 88:
      He pleaded guilty to the charge, so far as acknowledging that he had corresponded with other women lately, in order to get the better of his affection for me, but the experiment had failed, and he found that he should be for ever miserable.
    • 1756, Thomas Amory, Life of John Buncle:
      When a Babylonian and his wife had a mind to correspond, they always first lit up the fuming pan, imagining it improved the passion.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

correspond

  1. third-person singular present indicative of correspondre