cosmos

See also: Cosmos

EnglishEdit

Camera icon.svg This entry needs a photograph or drawing for illustration. Please try to find a suitable image on Wikimedia Commons or upload one there yourself!

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek κόσμος (kosmos, world, universe).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies cosmos (countable and uncountable, plural cosmoses or cosmoi)

  1. The universe.
    • 2013 August 24, “A problem of cosmic proportions”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8850: 
      In Dr Wetterich’s picture of the cosmos the redshift others attribute to expansion is, rather, the result of the universe putting on weight. If atoms weighed less in the past, he reasons, the light they emitted then would, in keeping with the laws of quantum mechanics, have been less energetic than the light they emit now.
  2. An ordered, harmonious whole.
  3. Any of various mostly Mexican herbs of the genus Cosmos having radiate heads of variously coloured flowers and pinnate leaves.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Abbreviation of cosmopolitan

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cosmos

  1. plural form of cosmo

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

cosmos m (plural cosmos)

  1. Alternative form of cosmo.
  2. cosmos (herb of the genus Cosmos)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek κόσμος (kosmos) "world, universe".

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cosmos m (plural cosmos)

  1. universe
  2. space (area beyond the atmosphere of planets)
  3. cosmos (herbs of the genus Cosmos)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 21:52