See also: Cosmos

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
The cosmos

From Latinized form of Ancient Greek κόσμος (kósmos, world, universe).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) enPR: kŏz'mŏs, IPA(key): /ˈkɒz.mɒs/
    • (file)
  • (US) enPR: kŏz'mōs, IPA(key): /ˈkɑz.moʊs/
 cosmos on Wikipedia

NounEdit

cosmos (countable and uncountable, plural cosmoses or cosmoi)

  1. The universe.
    • 1929, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Disintegration Machine[1]:
      "Can you conceive a process by which you, an organic being, are in the same way dissolved into the cosmos, and then by a subtle reversal of the conditions reassembled once more?"
    • 1980, Carl Sagan, Cosmos:
      The Cosmos is all that is or was or ever will be. Our feeblest contemplations of the Cosmos stir us -- there is a tingling in the spine, a catch in the voice, a faint sensation, as if a distant memory, of falling from a height. We know we are approaching the greatest of mysteries.
    • 2013 August 24, “A problem of cosmic proportions”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8850:
      In Dr Wetterich’s picture of the cosmos the redshift others attribute to expansion is, rather, the result of the universe putting on weight. If atoms weighed less in the past, he reasons, the light they emitted then would, in keeping with the laws of quantum mechanics, have been less energetic than the light they emit now.
  2. An ordered, harmonious whole.
    • 1890, S.B. Palmer, “Matter and force in the oral cavity”, in The Dental Cosmos, volume XXXII, page 538:
      This simple cell is a cosmos in this respect : it represents the laws of the universe in changes of matter, and clearly exemplifies their workings in the oral cavity.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
garden cosmos, Cosmos bipinnatus

From the genus name Cosmos.

PronunciationEdit

 Cosmos (plant) on Wikipedia
 Cosmos on Wikispecies

Wikispecies

NounEdit

cosmos (countable and uncountable, plural cosmos)

  1. Any of various mostly Mexican herbs of the genus Cosmos having radiate heads of variously coloured flowers and pinnate leaves.
    • 1838, George B. Knowles and Frederic Westcott, The Floral Cabinet, and Magazine of Exotic Botany[2], volume 2, page 3:
      COSMOS DIVERSIFOLIUS. (Various-leaved Cosmos.)
    • 1842, Jane Loudon, Ladies’ Flower-garden of Ornamental Annuals[3], page 185:
      It was first described and figured in 1797, by Cavanilles, who called it Cosmos, from the Greek word Kosmos, beautiful ; but this name was afterwards altered by Willdenow to Cosmea, as being more consistent with the rules of botanical nomenclature.

Etymology 3Edit

 
a cosmo

PronunciationEdit

 Cosmo (cocktail) on Wikipedia

NounEdit

cosmos

  1. plural of cosmo


AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cosmos, from Ancient Greek κόσμος (kósmos).

NounEdit

cosmos m (plural cosmos)

  1. cosmos, universe

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cosmos, from Ancient Greek κόσμος (kósmos).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cosmos m (uncountable)

  1. cosmos, universe

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

cosmos m (plural cosmos)

  1. Alternative form of cosmo
  2. cosmos (herb of the genus Cosmos)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French cosmos

NounEdit

cosmos n (uncountable)

  1. cosmos, universe
  2. outer space

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cosmos, from Ancient Greek κόσμος (kósmos, world, universe).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkosmos/, [ˈkoz.mos]

NounEdit

cosmos m (plural cosmos)

  1. universe
    Synonyms: mundo, universo
  2. space (area beyond the atmosphere of planets)
    Synonym: espacio
  3. cosmos (herbs of the genus Cosmos)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit