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See also: Curt

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin curtus (shortened).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

curt (comparative curter, superlative curtest)

  1. Brief or terse, especially to the point of being rude.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, “XVIII and XIX”, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855:
      Again I begged her to keep an eye on her blood pressure and not get so worked up, and once more she brushed me off, this time with a curt request that I would go and boil my head. [...] Beginning with a curt “Listen, Buster,” she proceeded to sketch out with admirable clearness the salient points in the situation as she envisaged it [...]
  2. Short or concise.

VerbEdit

curt (third-person singular simple present curts, present participle curting, simple past and past participle curted)

  1. (obsolete, rare) To cut, cut short, shorten.
    • Sylvester (1618)
      Curting thy life, hee takes thy Card away.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin curtus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker-.

AdjectiveEdit

curt (feminine curta, masculine plural curts, feminine plural curtes)

  1. short

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin curtus.

AdjectiveEdit

curt m (feminine curte, masculine plural curts, feminine plural curtis)

  1. short

Related termsEdit


InterlingueEdit

AdjectiveEdit

curt

  1. short

LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin curtus.

AdjectiveEdit

curt m (feminine singular curta, masculine plural cursc, feminine plural curtes)

  1. brief, short

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

curt f (oblique plural curz or curtz, nominative singular curt, nominative plural curz or curtz)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of cort