brusque

See also: Brusque and brusqué

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French brusque, from Italian brusco (rude, sharp, sour); origin unknown.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɹuːsk/, /bɹʊsk/, /bɹʌsk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bɹʌsk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌsk

AdjectiveEdit

brusque (comparative brusquer or more brusque, superlative brusquest or most brusque)

  1. Rudely abrupt, unfriendly.
    • 1858, Anthony Trollope, Dr Thorne, ch. 3:
      He was brusque, authoritative, given to contradiction, rough though never dirty in his personal belongings, and inclined to indulge in a sort of quiet raillery.
    • 2019 April 28, Alex McLevy, “Game Of Thrones suffers the fog of war in the battle against the dead (newbies)”, in The A.V. Club[1]:
      When Dany showed up to throw the Night King off his steed and send him plunging to earth, it was at least a coherent action, which the brusque dragon-grappling prior to it failed to convey.

QuotationsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian brusco. Doublet of brusc.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brusque (plural brusques)

  1. abrupt (sudden or hasty)
    Synonyms: abrupt, brutal
  2. curt

VerbEdit

brusque

  1. first-person singular present indicative of brusquer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of brusquer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of brusquer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of brusquer
  5. second-person singular imperative of brusquer

Further readingEdit