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See also: décimal

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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin, Medieval Latin decimalis, from Latin decimus, from decem (ten) + adjective suffix -alis.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): [ˈdɛsɪməɫ]
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdɛsɪməl/
  • (file)

NounEdit

decimal (countable and uncountable, plural decimals)

  1. (countable) A number expressed in the base-ten system, (particularly) a fractional numeral written in this system.
    What is 7/23 as a decimal?
  2. (informal, uncountable) The decimal system itself.
  3. (informal) A decimal place.
    Pi has a value of 3.142, to three decimals.
  4. (informal) A decimal point.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

AdjectiveEdit

decimal (not comparable)

  1. (arithmetic, computing) Concerning numbers expressed in decimal or mathematical calculations performed using decimal.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

decimal (third-person singular simple present decimals, present participle decimaling, simple past and past participle decimaled)

  1. to represent with numbers after a decimal point
    • 1984 Robert William Dent, Proverbial Language in English Drama Exclusive of Shakespeare, 1495-1616: An Index
      Single- decimaled entries, often originating in Whiting (Wh) or Wilson (OW; see p. 23, fn.3), are from SPL. To save space, examples cited in SPL are normally not repeated (examples therefore begin with "Add:"). Double- decimaled entries, again often based on Wh or OW, are "new."
    • 2001 Richard J. Harris A Primer of Multivariate Statistics page 54
      simplified, substantively interpretable versions of the optimal (but many-decimaled) linear combinations of your original variables
    • 2015 Brad Knickerbocker, It’s Pi Day! Let’s have some pie. Christian Science Monitor
      So naturally, 3/14 – the 14th of March – is celebrated as “Pi Day.” And since 3.14 is the beginning, not the end of Pi – it can be decimaled on out to infinity – and since the next two numbers are 1 and 5 voila! today’s date 3/14/15 is really special.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin decimalis, from Latin decimus.

AdjectiveEdit

decimal m or f (plural decimais, comparable)

  1. (arithmetic, computing) decimal (concerning numbers expressed in decimal or calculations using decimal)

NounEdit

decimal m (plural decimais)

  1. (countable) decimal (number expressed in the decimal system)

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin decimalis, from Latin decimus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

decimal (plural decimales)

  1. decimal

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

decimal

  1. decimal (using ten digits 0-9)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of decimal
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular decimal
Neuter singular decimalt
Plural decimala
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 decimale
All decimala
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

decimal c

  1. a decimal place (digits expressing decimal fractions)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of decimal 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative decimal decimalen decimaler decimalerna
Genitive decimals decimalens decimalers decimalernas