destructive

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French destructif, from Latin destructivus, from past participle of destruere (to tear down, destroy) + -ivus.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈstɹʌktɪv/, /dɪˈstɹʊktɪv/

AdjectiveEdit

destructive (comparative more destructive, superlative most destructive)

  1. Causing destruction; damaging.
    • 2013 February 14, Scott Tobias, “Film: Reviews: A Good Day To Die Hard”, The Onion AV Club:
      After rescuing his estranged daughter in the last film, Live Free Or Die Hard, Willis heads to Russia to rescue his estranged son (Jai Courtney), a CIA agent on a mission to protect a whistleblower (Sebastian Koch) from a corrupt government official (Sergei Kolesnikov) with no shortage of destructive resources at his disposal.
  2. Causing breakdown or disassembly.
    Catabolism is a destructive metabolism which involves the break down of molecules and release of energy.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

destructive f

  1. feminine form of destructif

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dēstructīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of dēstructīvus
Last modified on 8 April 2014, at 13:49