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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English disporten, from Old French desporter, variant of deporter, depporter, from Latin deportāre, present active infinitive of deportō. More at deport.

VerbEdit

disport (third-person singular simple present disports, present participle disporting, simple past and past participle disported)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To amuse oneself divertingly or playfully; to cavort or gambol.
    • Buckle
      They could disport themselves.
    • Alexander Pope
      where light disports in ever mingling dyes
    • Byron
      Childe Harold basked him in the noontide sun, / Disporting there like any other fly.
    • 1905, William Somerset Maugham, chapter XXXVIII, in The Land of the Blessed Virgin: Sketches and Impressions in Andalusia, London: William Heinemann, OCLC 962027576, page 215:
      It was there [Cadiz, Spain] that on Sunday I had seen the populace disport itself, and it was full of life then, gay and insouciant.
  2. To display ostentatiously
  3. To remove from a port; to carry away.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prynne to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

disport (plural disports)

  1. (archaic) A pastime; anything which diverts one from serious matters; a game; sport; relaxation, recreation; entertainment; amusement
  2. (obsolete) Fun; gaiety; merriment; mirth; joy
  3. (obsolete) Deportment; bearing; carriage.
  4. (obsolete) orientation; elevation; bearing.
    • 1662, Thomas Salusbury, Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief Systems of the World (Dialogue Two)
      ... shooting a bullet ... out of a Culverin towards the East, and afterwards another, with the same charge, and at the same elevation or disport towards the West.

TranslationsEdit

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