See also: Drake and drakę

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /dɹeɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪk
 
Mallard drake

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English drake (male duck, drake), from Old English *draca, abbreviated form for Old English *andraca (male duck, drake, literally duck-king), from Proto-West Germanic *anadrekō (duck leader). Cognate with Low German drake (drake), Dutch draak (drake), German Enterich (drake). More at annet.

Noun edit

drake (plural drakes)

  1. A male duck.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English drake (dragon; Satan), from Old English draca (dragon, sea monster, huge serpent), from Proto-West Germanic *drakō (dragon), from Latin dracō (dragon), from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn, serpent, giant seafish), from δέρκομαι (dérkomai, I see clearly), from Proto-Indo-European *derḱ-. Compare Middle Dutch drake and German Drache. Doublet of dragon.

Noun edit

drake (plural drakes)

  1. A mayfly used as fishing bait.
  2. (poetic) A dragon.
    • 2016, Anthony Ryan, The Waking Fire: Book One of Draconis Memoria:
      Clay caught sight of the drake's wing outlined against the rising flames as it swept low over the desert.
  3. (historical) A small piece of artillery.
  4. A fiery meteor.
    • c. 1620, anonymous, “Tom o’ Bedlam’s Song” in Giles Earle his Booke (British Museum, Additional MSS. 24, 665):
      The moon’s my constant Mistresse
      & the lowlie owle my morrowe.
      The flaming Drake and yͤ Nightcrowe make
      mee musicke to my sorrowe.
  5. A beaked galley, or Viking warship.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Noun edit

drake

  1. plural of draak

Middle Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Old Dutch *drako, an early Germanic borrowing of Latin dracō (dragon).

Noun edit

drāke m

  1. dragon, wyrm

Inflection edit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants edit

  • Dutch: draak
    • Afrikaans: draak
  • Limburgish: draagk, draogk

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old English draca, aphetic form of *andraca, from Proto-West Germanic *anadrekō; compare ende (duck).

Noun edit

drake (plural drakes)

  1. drake (male duck)
Descendants edit
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old English draca, from Proto-West Germanic *drakō, from Latin dracō, from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn). Doublet of dragoun.

Noun edit

drake (plural drakes or draken)

  1. drake (dragon)
  2. (figuratively) Satan; the Devil.
  3. comet, shooting star
Descendants edit
References edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no
 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn) and Old Norse dreki.

Noun edit

drake m (definite singular draken, indefinite plural draker, definite plural drakene)

  1. a dragon
  2. a kite

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse dreki and Middle Low German drake, from Proto-West Germanic *drakō.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /²draːçə/, /²draːkə/

Noun edit

drake m (definite singular draken, indefinite plural drakar, definite plural drakane)

  1. a dragon
  2. a kite
  3. a type of longship decorated with a dragon's head

References edit

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish draki, borrowed from Middle Low German drake, from Proto-West Germanic *drakō.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

drake c

  1. a dragon
  2. a kite
  3. a male duck, drake
  4. a belligerent (older) woman; battle-ax

Declension edit

Declension of drake 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative drake draken drakar drakarna
Genitive drakes drakens drakars drakarnas

Anagrams edit