FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French entrer, from Old French entrer, from Latin intrāre, present active infinitive of intrō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

entrer

  1. (intransitive) to enter
    Entrer dans la salle.
    Enter the room.

Usage notesEdit

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French entrer, from Latin intrāre, present active infinitive of intrō.

VerbEdit

entrer

  1. (intransitive) to enter
    • 1488, Jean Dupré, Lancelot du Lac, page 71:
      Lancelot qui fut entré en la forest chevaucha tout le iour sans boire & sans menger
      Lancelot, who entered in to the forest, rode the entire day without drinking or eating

ConjugationEdit

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

DescendantsEdit

  • French: entrer

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French entrer (to enter), from Latin intrō, intrāre.

VerbEdit

entrer (gerund entréthie)

  1. (Jersey) to enter

AntonymsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

entrer

  1. present of entre

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin intrāre, present active infinitive of intrō.

VerbEdit

entrer

  1. (intransitive) to enter

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. In the present tense an extra supporting e is needed in the first-person singular indicative and throughout the singular subjunctive, and the third-person singular subjunctive ending -t is lost. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit