enter

See also: Enter, Enter., and enter-

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • entre (archaic, before circa 1700)

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English entren, from Old French entrer, from Latin intrō, from intrā (inside). Has been spelled as "enter" for several centuries even in the United Kingdom, although British English retains the "re" ending for many words such as centre, fibre, spectre, theatre, calibre, sombre, lustre, and litre.

VerbEdit

enter (third-person singular simple present enters, present participle entering, simple past and past participle entered)

  1. to go into (a room, etc.).
    You should knock before you enter my room, unless you want to see me naked.
    • 1555, John Proctor, The historie of Wyates rebellion, with the order and maner of resisting the same, ...[1], page 86:
      ... you can fynde in youre heartes to assaulte her with rebellion, or in any wise [ways] suffer any one eyvil motion to enter into your thoughtes against her?
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible (Authorized Version), John 3:5
      Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.
  2. (transitive) To cause to go (into), or to be received (into); to put in; to insert; to cause to be admitted.
    to enter a knife into a piece of wood
    to enter a boy at college, a horse for a race, etc.
  3. (figuratively) To come into a state or profession.
    My twelve-year-old son will be entering his teens next year.
    She had planned to enter the legal profession.
  4. (theater) To come onto the stage; to appear on stage.
    • 2012, Annette Lust, Bringing the Body to the Stage and Screen: Expressive Movement for Performers, ISBN 978-0-8108-8212-6, page 139:
      A young man enters from stage left and smiles at the nanny, who ignores him and quickly exits stage right.
  5. (transitive) To type (something) into a computer; to input.
    • Enter your user name and password.
  6. to record (something) in an account, ledger, etc.
    • 2003, A. Mukherjee and M. Hanif, Financial Accounting, ISBN 978-0-87083-038-9, page 27:
      Each amount entered in the debit column of the journal is posted by entering it on the credit side/column of of an account in the ledger.
  7. (law) To become a party to an agreement, treaty, etc.
  8. (law, intransitive) To become effective; to come into effect.
    • 2005, United Nations, Dispositions Législatives Et Réglementaires Nationales Relatives À la Prévention Et À L'élimination Du Terrorisme International, ISBN 978-92-1-033093-0, page 215:
      This Act shall enter into force on 01 March 1998.
  9. (law) To go into or upon, as lands, and take actual possession of them.
  10. (law) To place in regular form before the court, usually in writing; to put upon record in proper from and order.
    to enter a writ, appearance, rule, or judgment
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
  11. to make report of (a vessel or its cargo) at the custom house; to submit a statement of (imported goods), with the original invoices, to the proper customs officer for estimating the duties. See entry.
  12. (US) To file, or register with the land office, the required particulars concerning (a quantity of public land) in order to entitle a person to a right of preemption.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Abbott to this entry?)
  13. to deposit for copyright the title or description of (a book, picture, map, etc.).
    entered according to act of Congress
  14. (obsolete) To initiate; to introduce favourably.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

  • (intransitive) exit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

Enter-key marked with green, Return-key with red

enter (plural enters)

  1. (computing) Alternative spelling of Enter (the computer key).
  2. (computing) Alternative spelling of Enter (a stroke of the computer key).

TranslationsEdit

  • Romanian:
  • tasta de introducere de date f (def.), tastă de validare intrări f
  • bătaie pe tasta ''Enter'' f, tastare a tastei ''Enter'' f

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin integer, integrum.

AdjectiveEdit

enter m (feminine entera, masculine plural enters, feminine plural enteres)

  1. entire
  2. complete

NounEdit

enter m (plural enters)

  1. whole number, integer
  2. a complete lottery ticket (made up of ten dècims)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin imputāre, present active infinitive of imputō.

VerbEdit

enter

  1. (agriculture) to graft
  2. to implant

ConjugationEdit

AnagramsEdit


GaulishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • entar

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *enter (between), Proto-Indo-European *h₁enter (between). Cognates include Celtiberian entara (between), Old Irish eter (between) (Irish idir (between, both)), Latin inter (between), Sanskrit अन्तर् (antár, between, within, into), Oscan 𐌀𐌍𐌕𐌄𐌓 (anter, between), and Old High German untar (between).

PrepositionEdit

enter

  1. between, among

ReferencesEdit

  • Xavier Delamarre, Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise: Une approche linguistique du vieux-celtique continental, published 2003, ISBN 2-87772-237-6, page 163.
  • Ranko Matasović, Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic, published 2009, ISBN 978-90-04-17336-1, page 117.
Last modified on 1 April 2014, at 07:05