See also: Erk

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)k

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

erk (plural erks)

  1. (Britain, slang) a member of the groundcrew in the RAF.
    • 2004, Andrea Levy, Small Island, London: Review, Chapter Nine, p. 345,[1]
      But I wasn’t accepted for flying duty—eyesight failed me. Neither was Frank, which, I’m ashamed to say, I found a relief. We were both channelled as aircrafthands, known to everyone as erks.

Etymology 2Edit

InterjectionEdit

erk

  1. Expressing trepidation; eek.

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *herkkä. Cognate to Finnish herkkä (delicate, sensitive), Livonian erk (lively), and Votic herkka (gentle). See also ere.

AdjectiveEdit

erk (genitive ergu, partitive erku) or erk (genitive erga, partitive erka)

  1. lively, energetic, vivacious
  2. snappy, alert, sharp, ready to react
  3. bright, vivid, intense

DeclensionEdit


UzbekEdit

NounEdit

erk (plural erklar)

  1. freedom; liberty