See also: étymon

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἔτυμον (étumon, the true sense of a word according to its origin), from ἔτυμος (étumos, true, real, actual).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Examples

The Latin candidus (white) is the etymon of the English candid.

etymon (plural etymons or etyma)

  1. (linguistics) The original or earlier form of an inherited or borrowed word, affix, or morpheme either from an earlier period in a language's development, from an ancestral language, or from a foreign language.
    • 2018, James Lambert, “A multitude of ‘lishes’: The nomenclature of hybridity”, in English World-Wide[1], page 5:
      The resulting citation collection was databased and coded for meaning, etymon, and date range (earliest and latest occurrence found).
    Antonyms: derivative, reflex
    Coordinate term: cognate

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἔτυμον (étumon).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

etymon n (genitive etymī); second declension

  1. etymon

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter, Greek-type).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative etymon etyma
Genitive etymī etymōrum
Dative etymō etymīs
Accusative etymon etyma
Ablative etymō etymīs
Vocative etymon etyma

ReferencesEdit