See also: étymon

English edit

 
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Etymology edit

From Ancient Greek ἔτυμον (étumon, the true sense of a word according to its origin), from ἔτυμος (étumos, true, real, actual).

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɛt.ɪ.mɒn/, /ˈɛt.ə.mɒn/
  • (file)
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛt.ə.mɑn/

Noun edit

Examples

etymon (plural etymons or etyma)

  1. (linguistics) The original or earlier form of an inherited or borrowed word, affix, or morpheme either from an earlier period in a language's development, from an ancestral language, or from a foreign language.
    Synonym: etym
    Antonyms: derivative, reflex
    Coordinate term: cognate
    • 2006, Folia orientalia - Volumes 42-43, page 467:
      Here such cases as ghost words & misglosses, secondary semantics, different etymologies for one etymon or one etymology for different etyma, and finally semantic overpermissiveness are discussed.
    • 2018, James Lambert, “A multitude of ‘lishes’: The nomenclature of hybridity”, in English World-Wide[1], page 5:
      The resulting citation collection was databased and coded for meaning, etymon, and date range (earliest and latest occurrence found).
    • 2016, Bryan A. Garner, Garner's Modern English Usage, 4th edition:
      Parricide, the more usual word, means (1) "the murder of one's own father"; or (2) "someone who murders his or her own father" […] It is also used in extended senses, such as "the murder of the ruler of a country" and "the murder of a close relative." These are not examples of slipshod extension, however, for even the Latin etymon (parricida) was used in these senses.
  2. Meaning as derived and conveyed thereby: The literal meaning of a term according to its origin, which may differ from its usual meaning when the latter relies on idiomatic conventions that are not conveyed by the term alone (that is, they must be known in other ways, such as experience, training, education, or dictionary lookup).

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Ancient Greek ἔτυμον (étumon) or Latin etymon.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈeː.ti.mɔn/
  • Hyphenation: ety‧mon

Noun edit

etymon n (plural etyma)

  1. etymon [from early 18th c.]
    • 1710, Lambert ten Kate, Gemeenschap tussen de Gottische spraeke en de Nederduytsche, publ. by Jan Rieuwertszoon, page 20.
      Deze kennisse van 't Gottische baent ons eenen weg om het Etymon van vele onzer woorden te ontdekken, dat buyten dit behulp onnavorschelyk zoude zyn.
      This knowledge of Gothic makes a way for us to discover the etymon of many of our words, that would be inscrutable without this aid.

Related terms edit

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From Ancient Greek ἔτυμον (étumon).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

etymon n (genitive etymī); second declension

  1. etymon

Declension edit

Second-declension noun (neuter, Greek-type).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative etymon etyma
Genitive etymī etymōrum
Dative etymō etymīs
Accusative etymon etyma
Ablative etymō etymīs
Vocative etymon etyma

References edit

  • etymon”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • etymon”, in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]

Polish edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin etymon.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

etymon m inan

  1. (linguistics) etymon (ancestral form or source word)

Declension edit

Related terms edit

adjective
adverb
nouns
verbs

Further reading edit

  • etymon in Polish dictionaries at PWN