idiomatic

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἰδιωματικός (idiōmatikós, related to an idiom), from ἰδίωμα (idíōma, idiom).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɪdi.əˈmætɪk/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

idiomatic (comparative more idiomatic, superlative most idiomatic)

  1. Pertaining or conforming to idiom, the natural mode of expression of a language.
    The inclusion or omission of definite articles follows idiomatic norms in each language and depends on context and intent.
    In English, the only idiomatic position for a pronoun as the object of a phrasal verb is before the particle, whereas a noun as object can fall either before or after the particle; thus only he picked them up but either he picked his tools up or he picked up his tools.
  2. Resembling or characteristic of an idiom.
    an idiomatic phrase that warns us against pollyannaism is counting one's chickens before they hatch
  3. (music) Relating to parts or pieces which are written both within the natural physical limitations of the instrument and human body and, less so or less often, the styles of playing used on specific instruments.

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

idiomatic (plural idiomatics)

  1. Synonym of idiom

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French idiomatique

AdjectiveEdit

idiomatic m or n (feminine singular idiomatică, masculine plural idiomatici, feminine and neuter plural idiomatice)

  1. idiomatic

DeclensionEdit