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See also: Evert and évért

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ēvertere, from e (out) + vertere to turn around in various senses; hence in English: to turn about or overturn. In the 16th century the word appeared in the sense of upsetting or overturning; since the 18th century, the sense of turning out like a pocket has been the dominant usage.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

evert (third-person singular simple present everts, present participle everting, simple past and past participle everted)

  1. (transitive) To turn inside out, typically from within, like a pocket being emptied.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Arthur Henry Reginald Buller, Researches on Fungi:
      When a certain stage in the process has been reached, the palisade layer and the fibrous layer, which act as everting membranes, yield to the strain which has been set up and suddenly turn inside out

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