Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French avertir (turn, direct, avert; turn the attention, make aware), from Latin āvertere, present active infinitive of āvertō, from ab + vertō (to turn).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

avert (third-person singular simple present averts, present participle averting, simple past and past participle averted)

  1. (transitive) To turn aside or away.
    To avert the eyes from an object.
  2. (transitive) To ward off, or prevent, the occurrence or effects of.
    How can the danger be averted?
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      To avert his ire.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Prior
      Till ardent prayer averts the public woe.
  3. (intransitive, archaic) To turn away.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Thomson
      Cold and averting from our neighbour's good.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To turn away.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Francis Bacon
      When atheists and profane persons do hear of so many discordant and contrary opinions in religion, it doth avert them from the church.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • "avert" at OneLook® Dictionary Search.

AnagramsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Puter) aviert

EtymologyEdit

From Latin apertus.

AdjectiveEdit

avert m (feminine singular averta, masculine plural averts, feminine plural avertas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Surmiran, Vallader) open

Related termsEdit