See also: falcón

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Brown falcon (Falco berigora)

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English falcon, faulcon, from Old French falcun, from Late Latin falcō(falcon), of Germanic origin, probably via Old Frankish *falko(falcon, hawk), from Proto-Germanic *falkô(falcon), from Proto-Indo-European *pol̑-(pale), from *pel-(fallow).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: fôlʹkən, fôʹkən, fălʹkən, IPA(key): /ˈfɔː(l)kən/, /ˈfɒlkən/, /ˈfælkən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔːkən
 
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NounEdit

falcon ‎(plural falcons)

  1. Any bird of the genus Falco, all of which are birds of prey.
  2. A female such bird, a male being a tiercel.
  3. A light cannon used from the 15th to the 17th century; a falconet.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

falcon ‎(third-person singular simple present falcons, present participle falconing, simple past and past participle falconed)

  1. To hunt with a falcon or falcons.
    • 2003, Brenda Joyce, House of Dreams, page 175:
      He rode astride while hawking; she falconed in the ladylike position of sidesaddle.

AnagramsEdit


LadinEdit

NounEdit

falcon m

  1. kestrel

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

falcon m ‎(oblique plural falcons, nominative singular falcons, nominative plural falcon)

  1. Alternative form of faucon (falcon)

Old ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin falco.

NounEdit

falcon m ‎(oblique plural falcons, nominative singular falcons, nominative plural falcon)

  1. falcon (bird)

ReferencesEdit