Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

feriae

  1. plural of feria

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *fēs-io-, *fēsja-, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁s-yo-, from *dʰéh₁s (god, godhead, deity), related to Latin fēstus (festive). Cognate with Ancient Greek θεῖος (theîos, divine) and Oscan 𐌚𐌉𐌝𐌔𐌝𐌀𐌉𐌔 (fiísíais), 𐌚𐌉𐌉𐌔𐌉𐌉𐌔 (fiisiis), 𐌚𐌉𐌔𐌉𐌀𐌝𐌔 (fisiaís, dat.-abl. pl.). In classical Latin, rendered plural even for singular instances by the Latin treatment of most recurring calendrical days;[1][2] singular usage is a development in Late Latin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fēriae f pl (genitive fēriārum); first declension

  1. A holy day; a festival, a holiday.
  2. A vacation.
  3. (figuratively) Any occasion of rest, peace, or leisure.

DeclensionEdit

First declension.

Case Plural
nominative fēriae
genitive fēriārum
dative fēriīs
accusative fēriās
ablative fēriīs
vocative fēriae

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ Kennedy, Benjamin Hall, The Public School Latin Grammar (1879), p. 126.
  2. ^ Michels, Agnes Kirsopp, Calendar of the Roman Republic (2015), p. 19.

BibliographyEdit

  • feriae in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • feriae in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “feriae”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.feriae”.
  • feriae in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • feriae in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “fēriae”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 212-213