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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English fiken (to feign, dissemble, flatter), from Old English fician (to wheedle, flatter) (also found in compound befician (to deceive)), from Proto-Germanic *fikōną (to deceive), from Proto-Indo-European *peyǵ- (ill-meaning, evil-minded, treacherous, hostile, bad). Related to Old English ġefic (fraud, deceit, deception), Old English fācen (deceit, fraud, treachery, sin, evil, crime, blemish, fault), Middle High German veichen (dissembling, deceit, fraud), Latin piget (it irks, it annoys).

VerbEdit

fike (third-person singular simple present fikes, present participle fiking, simple past and past participle fiked)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To feign; dissemble; flatter.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English fiken, fyken (to fidget, move about restlessly, hasten away), from Old Norse fíkjast (to be eager or restless), from fíka (to climb, move). Cognate with Scots fyke (to move about restlessly, fidget, itch), Norwegian fika (to strive, take trouble), Icelandic fikinn (eager, greedy). Related to fig and fidget.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

fike (third-person singular simple present fikes, present participle fiking, simple past and past participle fiked)

  1. (intransitive) To move about in a quick, uneasy way; be constantly in motion.
  2. (transitive) To give trouble to; vex; perplex.

NounEdit

fike (plural fikes)

  1. Restlessness or agitation caused by trifling annoyance.
  2. (Britain dialectal) Any trifling peculiarity in regard to work which causes unnecessary trouble; teasing exactness of operation.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English fike, from Old English fīc (fig, fig-tree, fig-disease, venereal ulcer, hemorrhoids), from Proto-Germanic *fīkaz, *fīgō (fig), from Latin fīcus, fīca (fig, fig-tree). Cognate with Dutch vijg (fig), German Feige (fig), Swedish fikon (fig), Icelandic fikja (ficus). More at fig.

NounEdit

fike (plural fikes)

  1. (obsolete) A fig.
  2. (Britain dialectal) A sore place on the foot.

AnagramsEdit


EseEdit

NounEdit

fike

  1. chewing gum

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

fike

  1. Alternative form of fyke

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fíka, fíkja, from Latin ficus. Akin to English fig.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fike f (definite singular fika, indefinite plural fiker, definite plural fikene)

  1. a fig

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit