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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Latin perplexus (entangled, confused), from per (through) + plexus, perfect passive participle of plectō (plait, weave, braid).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

perplex (third-person singular simple present perplexes, present participle perplexing, simple past and past participle perplexed)

  1. (transitive) To cause to feel baffled; to puzzle.
  2. (transitive) To involve; to entangle; to make intricate or complicated.
    • John Locke
      What was thought obscure, perplexed, and too hard for our weak parts, will lie open to the understanding in a fair view.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To plague; to vex; to torment.
    • Granville
      Chloe's the wonder of her sex, 'Tis well her heart is tender, How might such killing eyes perplex, With virtue to defend her.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

perplex (comparative more perplex, superlative most perplex)

  1. (obsolete) intricate; difficult
    • Glanvill
      How the soul directs the spirits for the motion of the body, according to the several animal exigents, is perplex in the theory.

NounEdit

perplex (plural perplexes)

  1. (obsolete) A difficulty.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for perplex in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French perplexe, from Latin perplexus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɛʁˈplɛks/
  • Hyphenation: per‧plex
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

perplex (comparative perplexer, superlative am perplexesten)

  1. (colloquial, rarely attributive) confused, perplexed, puzzled
    Synonyms: verdutzt, verblüfft, verwirrt

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit