See also: VEX

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English vexen, from Old French vexer, from Latin vēxāre (disturb, agitate, annoy). Displaced native Middle English grillen (to vex, annoy) from Old English grillan. Doublet of quake.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: vĕks, IPA(key): /vɛks/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛks

VerbEdit

vex (third-person singular simple present vexes, present participle vexing, simple past and past participle vexed or (archaic) vext)

  1. (transitive, now rare) To trouble aggressively, to harass.
  2. (transitive) To annoy, irritate.
    Billy's professor was vexed by his continued failure to improve his grades.
  3. (transitive) To cause (mental) suffering to; to distress.
  4. (transitive, rare) To twist, to weave.
  5. (intransitive, obsolete) To be irritated; to fret.
    • 1613, George Chapman, The Revenge of Bussy D'Ambois
      Wake when thou would'st wake, fear nought, vex for nought
  6. (transitive) To toss back and forth; to agitate; to disquiet.

QuotationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

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Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

vex (plural vexes)

  1. (Scotland, obsolete) A trouble.

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

vex

  1. Alternative form of wax (wax)

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

vex

  1. Alternative form of vexen