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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English pasture, pastoure, borrowed from Anglo-Norman pastour, Old French pasture, from Latin pastūra, from the stem of pascere (to feed, graze).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɑːstjə/, /ˈpɑːstʃə/
  • (file)

NounEdit

pasture (countable and uncountable, plural pastures)

  1. Land, specifically, an open field, on which livestock is kept for feeding.
  2. Ground covered with grass or herbage, used or suitable for the grazing of livestock.
    • Bible, Psalms xxiii. 2
      He maketh me to lie down in green pastures.
    • Shakespeare
      So graze as you find pasture.
  3. (obsolete) Food, nourishment.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.x:
      Ne euer is he wont on ought to feed, / But toades and frogs, his pasture poysonous [...].
    • 1831 July 15, “Of the Blood”, in Western Journal of Health[1], volume 4, number 1, L. B. Lincoln, page 38:
      It was reserved for Christians to torture bread, the staff of life, bread for which children in whole districts wail, bread, the gift of pasture to the poor, bread, for want of which thousands of our fellow beings annually perish by famine; it was reserved for Christians to torture the material of bread by fire, to create a chemical and maddening poison, burning up the brain and brutalizing the soul, and producing evils to humanity, in comparison of which, war, pestilence, and famine, cease to be evils.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pasture (third-person singular simple present pastures, present participle pasturing, simple past and past participle pastured)

  1. (transitive) To move animals into a pasture.
  2. (intransitive) To graze.
  3. (transitive) To feed, especially on growing grass; to supply grass as food for.
    The farmer pastures fifty oxen; the land will pasture forty cows.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pastūra, from pāstus.

NounEdit

pasture f (plural pasturis)

  1. pasture

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

pasture f

  1. plural of pastura

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

pāstūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of pāstūrus

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French pasture.

NounEdit

pasture f (plural pastures)

  1. pasture (grassy field upon which cattle graze)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • pasture on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)
  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (pasture, supplement)

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pastūra, from pāstus.

NounEdit

pasture f (oblique plural pastures, nominative singular pasture, nominative plural pastures)

  1. pasture (grassy field upon which cattle graze)
    • 1377, Bernard de Gordon, Fleur de lis de medecine (a.k.a. lilium medicine), page 165 of this essay:
      les bestes doivent estre nourries en bonnes pastures
      the animals must be fed on good pastures
  2. pasture (nourishment for an animal)

DescendantsEdit