See also: fòme and ƒome

GalicianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fome f (plural fomes)

  1. Alternative form of fame

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

fome

  1. Alternative form of fom

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese fame, from Latin famēs (hunger) (possibly through a Vulgar Latin alternative accusative form Latin *fam(i)ne(m), or more likely a variant nominative form *famen), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰH- (to disappear). Compare Galician fame, Spanish hambre (Old Spanish fambre), French faim, Italian fame and Romanian foame (which likewise underwent an unusual phonetic development, possibly influenced by the unrelated Latin fomes (tinder)).

PronunciationEdit

 

  • Hyphenation: fo‧me

NounEdit

fome f (plural fomes)

  1. (uncountable) hunger (need or compelling desire for food)
    Tenho fome porque não como há três dias.
    I’m hungry because I haven’t eaten in three days.
    (literally, “I have hunger”)
  2. (figuratively) hunger (any strong desire)
    Fome de poder.
    Hunger for power.
    Synonyms: avidez, sede
  3. famine (extreme shortage of food in a region)
    Ocorreram várias fomes na Etiópia.
    Many famines took place in Ethiopia.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfome/ [ˈfo.me]
  • Rhymes: -ome
  • Hyphenation: fo‧me

AdjectiveEdit

fome (plural fomes)

  1. (Chile, colloquial) boring, unfunny, lame, uncool, dull, stale
    Synonyms: aburrido, soso

Further readingEdit