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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

fam (plural fams)

  1. (informal) Family.
    I'm gonna visit the fam.
  2. (colloquial, hospitality industry) Familiarization.
    The tourist board organized fam junkets for travel agents.
    She arranged back-to-back fams and took her boyfriend.
  3. (slang, African American Vernacular, MLE, Canada) A term of endearment between friends; derived from "family" but not used between relatives.
    Hey fam, how you doin'? / Safe mate, safe.

AnagramsEdit


Bulu (Cameroon)Edit

NounEdit

fam (plural befam)

  1. man (adult male human)

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan fam, from Latin famēs (hunger), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰH- (to disappear).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fam f (uncountable)

  1. hunger (desire for food)
  2. famine, starvation

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


HausaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English pound.

NounEdit

fâm m (plural fàmā̀fàmai or fàmfàmai)

  1. pound (currency used in the UK, obsolete in Nigeria)
  2. (colloquial) 2 naira.

Karipúna Creole FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French femme (woman; wife), from Latin femina.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fam

  1. woman (adult female human)
  2. wife (married woman)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • 1987, Alfred W. Tobler, Dicionário Crioulo Karipúna/Português Português/Crioulo Karípúna, Summer Institute of Linguistics, page 8.

Louisiana Creole FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French femme (woman).

NounEdit

fam

  1. woman

ReferencesEdit

  • Albert Valdman, Dictionary of Louisiana Creole

Mauritian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French femme

NounEdit

fam

  1. (derogatory) woman

ReferencesEdit

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

fam

  1. Alternative form of fome

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan fam, from Latin famēs (hunger).

NounEdit

fam m (uncountable)

  1. hunger

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *faimaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fām n

  1. foam

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: fome, fom, fam, foom, foome
    • English: foam
    • Scots: fame, faym, faem

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

fam f (oblique plural fans, nominative singular fam, nominative plural fans)

  1. Alternative form of fame

Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin famēs.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fam

  1. hunger
    • c. 1110, Guilhèm de Peitieus, ‘Canso’:
      Quar senes lieys non puesc viure, / Tant ai pres de s'amor gran fam.
      For without her I cannot live, such great hunger have I for her love.

DescendantsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) fom

EtymologyEdit

From Latin famēs.

NounEdit

fam f (usually uncountable)

  1. (Puter) hunger

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fam

  1. Soft mutation of mam.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
mam fam unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ZazakiEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to Persian ههم(fahm).

NounEdit

fam ?

  1. intelligence