See also: Forth, forþ, forð, forth-, forð-, and forþ-

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English forth, from Old English forþ, from Proto-Germanic *furþa-, from Proto-Indo-European *pŕ̥-to-, from *per-. Cognate with Dutch voort. See also ford.

AdverbEdit

forth (not comparable)

  1. Forward in time, place or degree.
  2. Out into view; from a particular place or position.
    The plants in spring put forth leaves.
    The robbers leapt forth from their place of concealment.
  3. (obsolete) Beyond a (certain) boundary; away; abroad; out.
  4. (obsolete) Thoroughly; from beginning to end.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

PrepositionEdit

forth

  1. (obsolete) Forth from; out of.

Etymology 2Edit

From fourth; compare forty.

AdjectiveEdit

forth

  1. Misspelling of fourth.

NounEdit

forth

  1. Misspelling of fourth.

AnagramsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *furþa-, from Proto-Indo-European *pr̥to-.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

forth

  1. forwards, forth; onward

PrepositionEdit

forth

  1. forward to, up to

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Low German: fort, vort