See also: FOSS, Foss, Foß, and fos

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

See fosse.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

foss (plural fosses)

  1. Alternative spelling of fosse

Etymology 2 edit

From Icelandic or Norwegian foss, both from Old Norse fors (waterfall). Doublet of force ("waterfall").

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

foss (plural fosses)

  1. (Northern England) A waterfall.
    • 2017, Benjamin Myers, The Gallows Pole, Bloomsbury, published 2019, page 101:
      Another of his flock was spotted garrotted, one found twisted and drowned at the bottom of a foss and a third split cleanly from scut to teeth.

Faroese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

foss

  1. indefinite accusative singular of fossur
  2. indefinite genitive singular of fossur

Hungarian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

fosik +‎ -j

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

foss

  1. second-person singular subjunctive present indefinite of fosik

Icelandic edit

 
Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse fors, foss.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

foss m (genitive singular foss, nominative plural fossar)

  1. a waterfall (permanent flow of water over the edge of a cliff)

Declension edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no
 
foss

Etymology edit

From Danish fos, revived through Norwegian foss, from Old Norse foss, fors, from Proto-Germanic *fursaz.

Noun edit

foss m (definite singular fossen, indefinite plural fosser, definite plural fossene)

  1. a waterfall

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse fors, foss, from Proto-Germanic *fursaz.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

foss m (definite singular fossen, indefinite plural fossar, definite plural fossane)

  1. a waterfall
    Synonyms: fossefall, vassfall

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • “foss” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • “foss” in Ivar Aasen (1873) Norsk Ordbog med dansk Forklaring

Old Irish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Celtic *uɸostos, from Proto-Indo-European *upo-sth₂-ós, from *upó (under) +‎ *steh₂- (to stand) +‎ *-ós (agent suffix).[1][2] Cognate to Welsh gwas (servant).

Noun edit

foss m (genitive foiss)

  1. servant
Inflection edit
Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative foss fossL foissL
Vocative foiss fossL fossuH
Accusative fossN fossL fossuH
Genitive foissL foss fossN
Dative fossL fossaib fossaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Celtic *wostos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wes- (to stay). Cognate to Middle Welsh gwas (abode).[3]

Noun edit

foss m (genitive foiss)

  1. rest, halt, the state of not being in motion
  2. perseverance
Inflection edit
Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative foss fossL foissL
Vocative foiss fossL fossuH
Accusative fossN fossL fossuH
Genitive foissL foss fossN
Dative fossL fossaib fossaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Descendants edit
  • Irish: fos

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
foss ḟoss foss
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ Delamarre, Xavier (2003), “uassos”, in Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise: une approche linguistique du vieux-celtique continental [Dictionary of the Gaulish language: A linguistic approach to Old Continental Celtic] (Collection des Hespérides; 9), 2nd edition, Éditions Errance, →ISBN, page 307
  2. ^ Uhlich, Jurgen (2002), “Verbal governing compounds (synthetics) in Early Irish and other Celtic languages”, in Transactions of the Philological Society, volume 100, issue 3, Wiley, →DOI, →ISSN, pages 403–433
  3. ^ Schrijver, Peter C. H. (1995) Studies in British Celtic historical phonology (Leiden studies in Indo-European; 5), Amsterdam, Atlanta: Rodopi, page 121

Further reading edit