See also: Halt, hält, and hált

English

edit
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation

edit

Etymology 1

edit

From Middle English halten, from Old English healtian (to be lame, walk with a limp), from Proto-Germanic *haltōną. English usage in the sense of 'make a halt' is from the noun. Cognate with North Frisian halte, Swedish halta.

Verb

edit

halt (third-person singular simple present halts, present participle halting, simple past and past participle halted) (obsolete)

  1. (intransitive) To limp; move with a limping gait.
  2. (intransitive) To stand in doubt whether to proceed, or what to do; hesitate; be uncertain; linger; delay; mammer.
  3. (intransitive) To be lame, faulty, or defective, as in connection with ideas, or in measure, or in versification.
  4. To waver.
  5. To falter.
Translations
edit

Etymology 2

edit

From Middle French halt, from early modern German halt (stop!), imperative of halten (to hold, to stop). More at hold.

Verb

edit

halt (third-person singular simple present halts, present participle halting, simple past and past participle halted)

  1. (intransitive) To stop marching.
  2. (intransitive) To stop either temporarily or permanently.
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, chapter I, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, →OCLC:
      And it was while all were passionately intent upon the pleasing and snake-like progress of their uncle that a young girl in furs, ascending the stairs two at a time, peeped perfunctorily into the nursery as she passed the hallway—and halted amazed.
  3. (transitive) To bring to a stop.
  4. (transitive) To cause to discontinue.
    The contract negotiations halted operations for at least a week.
Synonyms
edit
Translations
edit

Noun

edit

halt (plural halts)

  1. A cessation, either temporary or permanent.
    The contract negotiations put a halt to operations.
    • 1702–1704, Edward [Hyde, 1st] Earl of Clarendon, “(please specify |book=I to XVI)”, in The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, Begun in the Year 1641. [], Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed at the Theater, published 1707, →OCLC:
      Without any halt they marched.
    • 1962 April, R. K. Evans, “The Acceptance Testing of Diesel Locomotives”, in Modern Railways, page 268:
      Because most diesel failures can be traced to electrical faults, minor in themselves but often difficult to pin-point, any unscheduled halt during a trial run is often the signal for the frenzied unfolding of wiring diagrams and the appearance of an impressive array of voltmeters and circuit testers.
  2. (rail transport) A minor railway station (usually unstaffed) in the United Kingdom.
    The halt itself never achieved much importance, even with workers coming to and from the adjacent works.
    • 1961 November, H. G. Ellison, P. G. Barlow, “Journey through France: Part One”, in Trains Illustrated, page 668:
      On once more we swung, bumping uneasily along in the antique narrow-gauge coach, with gloomy woods and gathering night outside, shouts and songs (and quacks) inside—this was not at all the sort of train ordained by the logical strategists in Paris—then grinding to a stop at a mysterious halt which was no more than a nameboard in the pinewoods, without even a footpath leading to it, but nevertheless with a solitary passenger stolidly waiting.
Synonyms
edit
Derived terms
edit
Translations
edit

Etymology 3

edit

From Middle English halt, from Old English healt, from Proto-Germanic *haltaz (halt, lame), from Proto-Indo-European *kol-d-, from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (to beat, strike, cut, slash). Cognate with Danish halt, Swedish halt.

Adjective

edit

halt (comparative more halt, superlative most halt)

  1. (archaic) Lame, limping.

Noun

edit

halt (plural halts)

  1. (dated) Lameness; a limp.

Etymology 4

edit

Borrowed from French halte.

Noun

edit

halt (plural halts)

  1. (British, Ireland) A small railroad station, usually unstaffed or with very few staff, and with few or no facilities.
Derived Terms
edit

Anagrams

edit

Alemannic German

edit

Etymology

edit

From Middle High German halt. Cognate with German halt (adverb).

Pronunciation

edit

Adverb

edit

halt

  1. so, just, simply
    • 1978, Rolf Lyssy & Christa Maerker, Die Schweizermacher, (transcript):
      Chömmer halt e chli früner. Schadet a nüt.
      So we'll arrive a little earlier. Won't do any harm.

Czech

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Interjection

edit

halt

  1. Alternative form of holt

Danish

edit

Etymology

edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective

edit

halt

  1. lame

East Central German

edit

Etymology

edit

Compare German halt.

Adjective

edit

halt

  1. (Erzgebirgisch) so, just, simply
    Sis halt su.
    It's just like that.

Further reading

edit
  • 2020 June 11, Hendrik Heidler, Hendrik Heidler's 400 Seiten: Echtes Erzgebirgisch: Wuu de Hasen Hoosn haaßn un de Hosen Huusn do sei mir drhamm: Das Original Wörterbuch: Ratgeber und Fundgrube der erzgebirgischen Mund- und Lebensart: Erzgebirgisch – Deutsch / Deutsch – Erzgebirgisch[2], 3. geänderte Auflage edition, Norderstedt: BoD – Books on Demand, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 57:

German

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Etymology 1

edit

From the verb halten (to hold; to stop).

Verb

edit

halt

  1. singular imperative of halten

Interjection

edit

halt!

  1. stop!, wait!
Descendants
edit
  • Dutch: halt
  • Italian: alt
  • Spanish: alto
  • Portuguese: alto
  • Swedish: halt
  • Middle French: halt

Etymology 2

edit

From Middle High German halt, pertaining to Old High German halto (soon, fast). Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *haldiz, an adverbial comparative like *batiz.

Adverb

edit

halt

  1. (colloquial, modal particle) Indicating that something is generally known, or cannot be changed, or the like; often untranslatable; so, just, simply, indeed, well
    Synonym: eben
    Er ist halt ein Idiot.Well, he’s an idiot.
    Dann müssen wir halt härter arbeiten.
    Then we’ll just have to work harder.
Usage notes
edit
  • The word is originally southern German and is still considered so by some contemporary dictionaries. It has, however, become common throughout the language area during the past decades.
Descendants
edit
See also
edit

Further reading

edit
  • halt” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Hungarian

edit

Etymology

edit

hal (to die) +‎ -t (past-tense and past-participle suffix)

Pronunciation

edit

Verb

edit

halt

  1. third-person singular indicative past indefinite of hal

Usage notes

edit

This form normally occurs when a verbal prefix is separated from the verb:

Participle

edit

halt

  1. past participle of hal

Declension

edit
Inflection (stem in -a-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative halt haltak
accusative haltat haltakat
dative haltnak haltaknak
instrumental halttal haltakkal
causal-final haltért haltakért
translative halttá haltakká
terminative haltig haltakig
essive-formal haltként haltakként
essive-modal
inessive haltban haltakban
superessive halton haltakon
adessive haltnál haltaknál
illative haltba haltakba
sublative haltra haltakra
allative halthoz haltakhoz
elative haltból haltakból
delative haltról haltakról
ablative halttól haltaktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
halté haltaké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
haltéi haltakéi

Irish

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

halt m

  1. h-prothesized form of alt

Norwegian Nynorsk

edit

Etymology 1

edit

From Old Norse haltr, from Proto-Germanic *haltaz.

Pronunciation

edit

Adjective

edit

halt (indefinite singular halt, definite singular and plural halte, comparative haltare, indefinite superlative haltast, definite superlative haltaste)

  1. limp, limping

Verb

edit

halt

  1. imperative of halta

Etymology 2

edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Participle

edit

halt (definite singular and plural halte)

  1. past participle of hala

Verb

edit

halt

  1. supine of hala

References

edit

Old French

edit

Etymology

edit

From a conflation of Frankish *hauh, *hōh (high, tall, elevated) and Latin altus (high, raised, profound).

Pronunciation

edit

IPA(key): /ˈhalt/

Adjective

edit

halt m (oblique and nominative feminine singular halte)

  1. high; elevated

Adverb

edit

halt

  1. loud; loudly

Derived terms

edit

Descendants

edit

Old Norse

edit

Adjective

edit

halt

  1. strong neuter nominative/accusative singular of haltr

Verb

edit

halt

  1. second-person singular imperative active of halda

Swedish

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

halt c

  1. content, level (relative amount of something, in a mixture or the like)
    alkoholhalt
    alcohol content
    fetthalt
    fat content
    sanningshalt
    veracity ("truth content")
    en hög halt av alkohol i blodet
    a high concentration of alcohol in the blood
  2. stopping (during a march, or more generally)
    Hären gjorde halt
    The army stopped ("made halt")

Declension

edit
Declension of halt 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative halt halten halter halterna
Genitive halts haltens halters halternas
edit

Interjection

edit

halt

  1. halt! (stop!) (during a march, or more generally)

Adjective

edit

halt (not comparable)

  1. having a limp, lame, halt

Declension

edit
Inflection of halt
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular halt
Neuter singular halt
Plural halta
Masculine plural3 halte
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 halte
All halta
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic
edit

Adjective

edit

halt

  1. indefinite neuter singular of hal

References

edit