See also: förs

English edit

Noun edit

fors pl (plural only)

  1. Only used in fors and againsts

Catalan edit

Noun edit

fors

  1. plural of for

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔrs

Adjective edit

fors (comparative forser, superlative meest fors or forst)

  1. stout, large
  2. substantial, considerable

Inflection edit

Inflection of fors
uninflected fors
inflected forse
comparative forser
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial fors forser het forst
het forste
indefinite m./f. sing. forse forsere forste
n. sing. fors forser forste
plural forse forsere forste
definite forse forsere forste
partitive fors forsers

Adverb edit

fors

  1. strongly

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fors

  1. plural of for

Preposition edit

fors

  1. except, save
    Tout est perdu fors l’honneur.
    All is lost save honour.

Further reading edit

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Italic *fortis, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰértis (the act of carrying) (compare Old Irish brith, German Geburt, English bear, burden, Russian бремя (bremja, burden), брать (bratʹ, to take), Sanskrit भृति (bhṛti, carrying)), derivative of *bʰer-, whence also Latin ferō (bring, carry). For the semantic development, compare Proto-Germanic *buriz (favorable wind), from the same root.

Noun edit

fors f (genitive fortis); third declension

  1. luck, chance
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 4.507:
      fors suā cuique locō est
      Luck: And each place has its own.
      (Ovid tells what happens when Ceres (mythology) visits a family living at a site later known as Eleusis. Although ‘‘fors’’ is sometimes translated as ‘‘destiny,’’ which may imply determination, Ovid's probable meaning is that of random chance; idiomatically, ‘‘good luck.’’)
Declension edit

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative fors fortēs
Genitive fortis fortium
Dative fortī fortibus
Accusative fortem fortēs
fortīs
Ablative forte fortibus
Vocative fors fortēs
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From contraction of fors sit (it might happen).

Alternative forms edit

Adverb edit

fors (not comparable)

  1. perhaps, perchance

References edit

  • fors”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fors”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fors”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fors in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • fors in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) quite accidentally, fortuitously: temere et fortuito; forte (et) temere
    • (ambiguous) to be brave by nature: animo forti esse
    • (ambiguous) personally brave: manu fortis
  • fors in Ramminger, Johann (2016 July 16 (last accessed)) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Middle French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French fors, from Latin foris.

Preposition edit

fors

  1. apart from

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin foris.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

fors

  1. outside

Preposition edit

fors

  1. outside
  2. apart from

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Middle French: fors

Old Norse edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *fursaz, from Pre-Germanic *pŕ̥sos, from Proto-Indo-European *pers- (to spray, splash).

Noun edit

fors m (genitive fors, plural forsar)

  1. a waterfall

Declension edit

Descendants edit

References edit

  • fors”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fors”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fors”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fors in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) quite accidentally, fortuitously: temere et fortuito; forte (et) temere
    • (ambiguous) to be brave by nature: animo forti esse
    • (ambiguous) personally brave: manu fortis
  • fors in Ramminger, Johann (2016 July 16 (last accessed)) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[4], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Old Swedish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse fors, from Proto-Germanic *fursaz.

Noun edit

fors m

  1. torrent, stream
  2. waterfall

Declension edit

The template Template:gmq-osw-decl-noun-a-m does not use the parameter(s):
gen_sg=fors
gen_sg_d=forsins
nom_sg=fors
nom_sg_d=fors
Please see Module:checkparams for help with this warning.

Descendants edit

Portuguese edit

Noun edit

fors

  1. plural of for

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish fors, from Old Norse fors, from Proto-Germanic *fursaz.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fors c

  1. a rapid, whitewater
  2. a chute (in a river)

Declension edit

Declension of fors 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fors forsen forsar forsarna
Genitive fors forsens forsars forsarnas

Related terms edit

Walloon edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fors

  1. plural of for