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See also: giê, ġie, giẻ, and gi'e

Contents

Middle EnglishEdit

PronounEdit

gie

  1. (chiefly Northern dialectal) Alternative form of ye

ReferencesEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) gea
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) ea
  • (Puter, Vallader) schi

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sic.

AdverbEdit

gie

  1. (Sursilvan) yes (used to indicate agreement with a positive statement)

Related termsEdit


ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English given, geven, gifen, from Old Norse gefa.

VerbEdit

gie (third-person singular present gies, present participle giein, past gied, past participle gied or gien)

  1. To give.
    Gie us a brak.
    • 1824, Sir Walter Scott, Wandering Willie's Tale (in Redgauntlet)
      “Here, Dougal,” said the laird, “gie Steenie a tass of brandy, till I count the siller and write the receipt.”

Derived termsEdit


Southern SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

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PronounEdit

gie

  1. (interrogative) who
  2. (relative) who, that, which

InflectionEdit

This pronoun needs an inflection-table template.

Further readingEdit