See also: Bain and bain-

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bain, bayne, bayn, beyn (direct, prompt), from Old Norse beinn (straight, right, favourable, advantageous, convenient, friendly, fair, keen).

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bain (comparative more bain, superlative most bain)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal) Ready; willing.
  2. (now chiefly dialectal) Direct; near; short; gain.
    That is the bainest way.
  3. (now chiefly dialectal) Limber; pliant; flexible.

AdverbEdit

bain (comparative more bain, superlative most bain)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal) Readily; willingly.
  2. (now chiefly dialectal) Nearby; at hand.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English bayne, baine, from Old French bain (bath), from Latin balneum (bath, bath-house). Doublet of bagnio.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

bain (plural bains)

  1. (obsolete) A bath.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, “xj”, in Le Morte Darthur, book VIII:
      THus was sir Tramtryst longe there wel cherysshed / with the kynge and the quene / [] / So vpon a daye / the quene and la beale Isoud made a bayne for syre Tramtryst / And whan he was in his bayne / the quene and Isoud her doughter romed vp & doune in the chamber / and there whyles Gouernail and Heles attendyd vpon Tramtryst

AnagramsEdit


BavarianEdit

NounEdit

bain ? 

  1. (Sappada, Sauris, Timau) wine

ReferencesEdit

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

CimbrianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German wīn, from Old High German wīn, from Proto-West Germanic *wīn, from Latin vīnum. Cognate with German Wein, English wine.

NounEdit

bain m

  1. (Sette Comuni, Tredici Comuni) wine
    Dar bain ist och gamacht mettar baimarn.The wine is also made with grapes. (Sette Comuni dialect)

ReferencesEdit

  • “bain” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo
  • “bain” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Vulgar Latin *baneum (bath), from Latin balneum or balineum, from Ancient Greek βαλανεῖον (balaneîon). Doublet of bagne.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɛ̃/
  • (file)

NounEdit

bain m (plural bains)

  1. bath

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IlocanoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ba‧in
  • IPA(key): /baˈʔin/, [bɐˈʔɛn]

NounEdit

baín

  1. shame

Derived termsEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a conflation of Old Irish benaid (beat, strike) and boingid (break, cut).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bˠanʲ/, /bˠɪnʲ/

VerbEdit

bain (present analytic baineann, future analytic bainfidh, verbal noun baint, past participle bainte) (transitive, intransitive)

  1. extract from bed in ground, dig out; dig up (potatoes, etc.); mine (coal, etc.)
  2. separate from root, stem, etc.; reap, pick; cut (hay, turf, flowers, etc.), mow
  3. release from socket; open
  4. release from source; shed
  5. release sound; strike
  6. agitate
  7. release from hold; lift
  8. win
  9. become due

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bain bhain mbain
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Limos KalingaEdit

NounEdit

bain

  1. shame

AdjectiveEdit

bain

  1. bashful; shy

RomanschEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin bene.

AdverbEdit

bain

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) well
  2. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) beautifully
  3. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) yes (used to disagree with a negative statement)
Alternative formsEdit
  • (Sursilvan) bein
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) bagn
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

bain m (plural bains)

  1. (Puter, Vallader) farm
Alternative formsEdit
SynonymsEdit

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse bein, from Proto-Germanic *bainą.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbeɪ̯ːn/, /ˈbeɪ̯ːɳ/, /ˈbeːɳ/, /ˈbe̞ɪ̯ːɳ/, /ˈbäɪ̯ːɳ/, /ˈbɑːɳ/, /ˈbäɪ̯ːn/
    Rhymes: -éɪ̯ːn

NounEdit

bain n

  1. A leg.
    hava ilt i bęiɳęn, i bęiɳåm
    to have a pain in the leg, in the legs
  2. A bone.

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Rietz, Johan Ernst, “BAJN el. bain”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 19