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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gracilis(slender). In the “graceful” sense, apparently influenced by the non-cognate word grace (cf. to contrast the distinct etymologies).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gracile ‎(comparative more gracile, superlative most gracile)

  1. Slender; thin; lean.
    • 1853, Works of Walter Savage Landor:
      Unswathe his Egyptian mummy; and ... you disclose the grave features and gracile bones of ... a cat
    • 1971, Oxford English Dictionary#Compact_editions:
      Gracile ... By some recent writers misused (through association with grace) for "Gracefully slender":
    • 2005, Richard Dawkins, The Ancestor's Tale:
      They seem to have evolved from more ‘gracile’ apes (gracile being the opposite of robust).
    • 2009, Clive Finlayson, Neanderthals and Modern Humans:
      A more gracile morphology would have been far more efficient over larger areas.
  2. Graceful or gracefully slender.

TranslationsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin gracilis. Doublet of grêle.

AdjectiveEdit

gracile m, f ‎(plural graciles)

  1. gracile

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gracile m, f ‎(masculine and feminine plural gracili)

  1. delicate, frail, weakly
  2. slender, thin

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit