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See also: gravitás

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin gravitās (weight, heaviness). Doublet of gravity.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gravitas (uncountable)

  1. Seriousness in bearing or manner; dignity.
  2. (figuratively) Substance, weight.
    • 2014 September 7, Natalie Angier, “The Moon comes around again [print version: Revisiting a moon that still has secrets to reveal: Supermoon revives interest in its violent origins and hidden face, International New York Times, 10 September 2014, p. 8]”, in The New York Times[1]:
      Unlike most moons of the solar system, ours has the heft, the gravitational gravitas, to pull itself into a sphere.

Usage notesEdit

Frequently used in a jocular or stilted sense.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

VerbEdit

gravitas

  1. present of graviti

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gravitas

  1. second-person singular past historic of graviter

IdoEdit

VerbEdit

gravitas

  1. present of gravitar

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From gravis (heavy) +‎ -tās

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gravitās f (genitive gravitātis); third declension

  1. weight, heaviness
  2. severity, harshness
  3. importance, presence, influence
  4. gravity
  5. pregnancy
  6. (New Latin, physics) gravity

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative gravitās gravitātēs
Genitive gravitātis gravitātum
Dative gravitātī gravitātibus
Accusative gravitātem gravitātēs
Ablative gravitāte gravitātibus
Vocative gravitās gravitātēs

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

gravitas

  1. Second-person singular (tu) present indicative of gravitar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

gravitas

  1. Informal second-person singular () present indicative form of gravitar.