See also: pondes

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pondus (a weight).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pondus

  1. (historical) An old English measure of weight, usually of wool, perhaps equal to 3 cloves.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 4, p. 208:
      The pondus of wool at Alton Barnes and Stert is three cloves or 21 pounds.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

ParticipleEdit

pondus m pl

  1. masculine plural of the past participle of pondre

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *pondos, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pénd-os, from *(s)pend-. Related to pendō, pendeō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pondus n (genitive ponderis); third declension

  1. weight
    Synonyms: mōlēs, onus, gravitās
  2. weight of a pound
  3. heaviness, weight of a body
  4. load, burden
  5. quantity, number, multitude
  6. consequence, importance
    Synonyms: importantia, gravitās, mōmentum, opportūnitās
  7. (of character) firmness, constancy

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pondus pondera
Genitive ponderis ponderum
Dative ponderī ponderibus
Accusative pondus pondera
Ablative pondere ponderibus
Vocative pondus pondera

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Proto-Germanic: *pundą (see there for further descendants)
  • Irish: poinn, puinn
  • Portuguese: pondo
  • Russian: пуд (pud)
  • Romanian: pondere

See alsoEdit

  • Finnish: pontus (overweight person) (colloquial)

ReferencesEdit

  • pondus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pondus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pondus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • pondus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • gravity: nutus et pondus or simply nutus (ῥοπή)
  • pondus”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pondus

  1. gravity, authority, weightfulness