See also: molés, môles, and Moles

English

edit

Noun

edit

moles

  1. plural of mole

Anagrams

edit

Catalan

edit

Etymology 1

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

moles

  1. plural of mola (millstone)

Etymology 2

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

moles

  1. plural of mola (mass (large volume); sunfish; etc.)

Etymology 3

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Verb

edit

moles

  1. second-person singular present indicative of molar (to mock)

Etymology 4

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Verb

edit

moles

  1. second-person singular present indicative of molar (to sharpen (dialectal))

Danish

edit

Noun

edit

moles c

  1. indefinite genitive singular of mole

French

edit

Pronunciation

edit
  • Audio:(file)

Noun

edit

moles f

  1. plural of mole

Galician

edit

Verb

edit

moles

  1. second-person singular present indicative of mulir

Jamaican Creole

edit

Etymology

edit

Derived from English molest.

Verb

edit

moles

  1. to molest
    • 1995 February 8, Carolyn Cooper, Noises in the Blood: Orality, Gender, and the "Vulgar" Body of Jamaican Popular Culture, Duke University Press, →ISBN:
      ... infamieshan wi no gi If a man a moles mi an mi famili Mi naa ron fi poliis ar sikuoriti Mi uda chek fi mi ruud bwai kompini [We are not informers, we don't give information If someone is molesting me and my family I wouldn't run to []

Latin

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-Indo-European *meh₃- (to exert) (though de Vaan reconstructs the Proto-Indo-European root as *melos (trouble, obstacle) instead[1]). Cognate with Ancient Greek μῶλος (môlos, turmoil) and German mühen (to labor, toil). See also Latin mōs.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

mōlēs f (genitive mōlis); third declension

  1. multitude, mass (of material)
    Synonyms: multitūdō, frequentia, cōpia, ūbertās, nūbēs
  2. (by extension) size
  3. rock, boulder, cliff, ridge, outcrop, knoll
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 5.149–152:
      est mōlēs nātīva locō rēs nōmina fēcit:
      appellant Saxum; pars bona montis eā est.
      huic Remus īnstiterat frūstrā, quō tempore frātrī
      prīma Palātīnae signa dedistis avēs.
      There is a ridge, that which gave natural names to the place: they call it the Rock; it forms a good part of the [Aventine] Hill. To this [place] Remus had uselessly embarked, at which time you, birds of the Palatine, gave foremost omens to his brother, [Romulus].
      (See Aventine Hill.)
  4. heap, pile
    Synonyms: cumulus, massa, acervus
  5. (military) war machine
  6. weight, burden, heaviness
    Synonyms: onus, pondus, gravitās
  7. strife, endeavour, effort
    Synonyms: cōnātus, studium, opus, opera, labor, mōlīmen, cūra, intēnsiō, pulvis
  8. difficulty, labor, trouble
    Synonyms: difficultās, īnfortūnium, cūra
  9. fortification, wall, rampart
    Synonyms: munitio, praesidium
  10. mass of soldiers, a large army
  11. mole, pier, jetty

Declension

edit

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mōlēs mōlēs
Genitive mōlis mōlium
Dative mōlī mōlibus
Accusative mōlem mōlēs
mōlīs
Ablative mōle mōlibus
Vocative mōlēs mōlēs

Derived terms

edit

Descendants

edit
  • Catalan: mola, moll (see there for further descendants)
  • Ancient Greek: μόλος (mólos)
  • Italian: mole
  • Portuguese:
  • Spanish: mole
  • Borrowings:

References

edit
  • moles”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • moles”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • moles in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • moles in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • moles in Ramminger, Johann (2016 July 16 (last accessed)) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • Dizionario Latino, Olivetti
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) “mōlēs”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 386

Portuguese

edit

Adjective

edit

moles

  1. masculine/feminine plural of mole

Noun

edit

moles m

  1. plural of mol

Noun

edit

moles f

  1. plural of mole

Spanish

edit

Adjective

edit

moles m pl or f pl

  1. plural of mole

Noun

edit

moles m pl

  1. plural of mol
  2. plural of mole

Verb

edit

moles

  1. second-person singular present subjunctive of molar