harangue

See also: harangué

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English arang and French harangue, from Old Italian aringa (modern Italian arringa) from aringare (speak in public) (modern Italian arringare), from aringo (public assembly), from Gothic *𐌷𐍂𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (*hriggs)[1], akin to Old High German hring (ring) (whence German Ring).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /həˈɹæŋ/
  • (US)
    (file)
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /həˈɹeɪŋ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æŋ
  • Hyphenation: ha‧rangue

NounEdit

harangue (plural harangues)

  1. An impassioned, disputatious public speech.
  2. A tirade, harsh scolding or rant, whether spoken or written.
    Synonyms: admonition, condemnation, criticism, diatribe, polemic, rant, screed, tirade; see also Thesaurus:diatribe
    She gave her son a harangue about the dangers of playing in the street.
    The priest took thirty minutes to deliver his harangue on timeliness, making the entire service run late.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

harangue (third-person singular simple present harangues, present participle haranguing, simple past and past participle harangued)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To give a forceful and lengthy lecture or criticism to someone.
    Synonyms: admonish, berate, lecture, speech
    The angry motorist leapt from his car to harangue the other driver.
    • 1711, Jonathan Swift, An Excellent New Song
      He has vamp'd an old speech, and the court to their sorrow, / Shall hear him harangue against Prior to morrow.
    • 1814 July, [Jane Austen], chapter XV, in Mansfield Park: [], volume I, London: [] T[homas] Egerton, [], OCLC 39810224, page 293:
      This picture of her consequence had some effect, for no one loved better to lead than Maria;—and with far more good humour she answered, "I am much obliged to you, Edmund;—you mean very well, I am sure—but I still think you see things too strongly; and I really cannot undertake to harangue all the rest upon a subject of this kind.—There would be the greatest indecorum I think."

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper, “harangue”, in Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2021.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French harangue (a public address, public discourse), from Old Italian aringo (arena, public square, platform), from Frankish *hring (circle, ring) or Gothic 𐌷𐍂𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (hriggs, ring, circle), both from Proto-Germanic *hringaz (circle, ring), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)krengʰ- (to turn, bend), from *(s)ker- (to turn, bend). Cognate with Old High German hring (circle, ring), Old English hring (circle, ring). Alternative etymology suggests the possibility that the Italian word may be derived from a Frankish compound *hari-hring (circular gathering, literally host-ring or army-ring). More at here, ring.

NounEdit

harangue f (plural harangues)

  1. harangue

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

harangue

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of haranguer
  2. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of haranguer
  3. second-person singular imperative of haranguer

Further readingEdit